Richard Viguerie first collected massive mailing lists of conservatives after the Goldwater campaign. He was able to go to the Clerk of the House of Representatives, which is where, under campaign finance laws, they have the names and addresses of anyone who contributed more than $50 to a presidential campaign. He had temp workers copy down the names and addresses — which no one had really tried or thought of before — and he had thousands and thousands of them before the administrator there asked what he was doing and kind of chased them out. Very famously, those people were still getting solicitations decades later. What he ended up mastering was a rhetorical style which is very familiar to viewers of Fox News, in which the apocalypse is right around the corner, and his innovation was to intimate that you could help stop it with a, y’know, $5, $10, $50 donation. His business model, as was very soon discovered, was taking 95 percent to sometimes even more than 100 percent of the take for his own purposes and profit and giving in only a minuscule percentage of the proceeds to the ostensible beneficiary, whether it was a fund that supposedly helped FBI officers injured in the line of duty or sending Bibles to Africa or supporting something like the National Conservative Political Action Committee.


Richard Viguerie first collected massive mailing lists of conservatives after the Goldwater campaign. He was able to go to the Clerk of the House of Representatives, which is where, under campaign finance laws, they have the names and addresses of anyone who contributed more than $50 to a presidential campaign. He had temp workers copy down the names and addresses — which no one had really tried or thought of before — and he had thousands and thousands of them before the administrator there asked what he was doing and kind of chased them out. Very famously, those people were still getting solicitations decades later. What he ended up mastering was a rhetorical style which is very familiar to viewers of Fox News, in which the apocalypse is right around the corner, and his innovation was to intimate that you could help stop it with a, y’know, $5, $10, $50 donation. His business model, as was very soon discovered, was taking 95 percent to sometimes even more than 100 percent of the take for his own purposes and profit and giving in only a minuscule percentage of the proceeds to the ostensible beneficiary, whether it was a fund that supposedly helped FBI officers injured in the line of duty or sending Bibles to Africa or supporting something like the National Conservative Political Action Committee.


My biggest concern with Big Data is the prospect that they will give managers and policy makers a sense of being in control when such confidence is not justified. We have incomplete or contradictory knowledge about large-scale, system-wide challenges such as climate change, or resource depletion. Such ‘wicked’ challenges do not lend themselves to data-driven solutions: These interconnected systems influence each other in unknowable ways

THACKARA, John (2013) Trust is not an algorithm, en Design Observer.

(via humanscalecities)


My biggest concern with Big Data is the prospect that they will give managers and policy makers a sense of being in control when such confidence is not justified. We have incomplete or contradictory knowledge about large-scale, system-wide challenges such as climate change, or resource depletion. Such ‘wicked’ challenges do not lend themselves to data-driven solutions: These interconnected systems influence each other in unknowable ways

THACKARA, John (2013) Trust is not an algorithm, en Design Observer.

(via humanscalecities)


What is it about modern conservatism that demands there always be not just a threat, but an existential threat? It’s not enough that Saddam Hussein was a vicious dictator, he also had to be just years away from unleashing a “mushroom cloud” upon us all. It’s not just that there was a temporary rise in the number of undocumented minors crossing our borders, we had to have people like Rep. Louie Gohmert explain to us why this was going to somehow result in the end of American civilization. And those kids probably had Ebola. And they were probably Muslims. Reforming health care was going to lead to a dystopian future in which you would appear before a government panel that decided whether you lived or died. Putin is an evil mastermind who has his eyes not just on Crimea or even Ukraine, but on most of Europe if we do not send in our own tanks, or talk much more angrily, or do some other unspecified something. Everything is the immediate precursor to Armageddon, every day, all the time.


What is it about modern conservatism that demands there always be not just a threat, but an existential threat? It’s not enough that Saddam Hussein was a vicious dictator, he also had to be just years away from unleashing a “mushroom cloud” upon us all. It’s not just that there was a temporary rise in the number of undocumented minors crossing our borders, we had to have people like Rep. Louie Gohmert explain to us why this was going to somehow result in the end of American civilization. And those kids probably had Ebola. And they were probably Muslims. Reforming health care was going to lead to a dystopian future in which you would appear before a government panel that decided whether you lived or died. Putin is an evil mastermind who has his eyes not just on Crimea or even Ukraine, but on most of Europe if we do not send in our own tanks, or talk much more angrily, or do some other unspecified something. Everything is the immediate precursor to Armageddon, every day, all the time.


The idea that you can merchandise candidates for high office like breakfast cereal – that you can gather votes like box tops – is, I think, the ultimate indignity to the democratic process.

Adlai Stevenson.

I hope everyone is ready to choose their favourite cereal…


A woman from the audience asks: ‘Why were there so few women among the Beat writers?’ and [Gregory] Corso, suddenly utterly serious, leans forward and says: “There were women, they were there, I knew them, their families put them in institutions, they were given electric shock. In the ’50s if you were male you could be a rebel, but if you were female your families had you locked up.


A woman from the audience asks: ‘Why were there so few women among the Beat writers?’ and [Gregory] Corso, suddenly utterly serious, leans forward and says: “There were women, they were there, I knew them, their families put them in institutions, they were given electric shock. In the ’50s if you were male you could be a rebel, but if you were female your families had you locked up.


White Americans have a criminal history; they have a criminal nation. The nation is built on criminality and murder and exploitation. It is a part of their collectible psyche. The United States is a mafia government. No one has done more damage and degradation and murder, rape, and robbery than Europeans. Therefore, in order to escape confrontation with their true criminal nature they must accuse others of being criminals. What we call projection. They must become obsessed with the criminality of other people. And Black folk become those other people.

“You call the Indians savages, so you can behave toward them savagely.” That’s the function of stereotyping. If I call you a criminal, then I can treat you criminally. “I don’t owe you justice. In fact, shooting you in the street is justice. We know you’re already a criminal, why should we bother to take you to trial?”

Dr. Amos N. Wilson (via disciplesofmalcolm)

Yes. Also see use of word “illegals” and how that plays out. See, too, the assumed criminality of Black, Brown, Golden, Red…. All assumed degenerate, always assumed criminal—all bearing the brunt of the criminal mind plagued by pale projection.

(via nezua)

CHURCH

(via peaceshine3)


White Americans have a criminal history; they have a criminal nation. The nation is built on criminality and murder and exploitation. It is a part of their collectible psyche. The United States is a mafia government. No one has done more damage and degradation and murder, rape, and robbery than Europeans. Therefore, in order to escape confrontation with their true criminal nature they must accuse others of being criminals. What we call projection. They must become obsessed with the criminality of other people. And Black folk become those other people.

“You call the Indians savages, so you can behave toward them savagely.” That’s the function of stereotyping. If I call you a criminal, then I can treat you criminally. “I don’t owe you justice. In fact, shooting you in the street is justice. We know you’re already a criminal, why should we bother to take you to trial?”

Dr. Amos N. Wilson (via disciplesofmalcolm)

Yes. Also see use of word “illegals” and how that plays out. See, too, the assumed criminality of Black, Brown, Golden, Red…. All assumed degenerate, always assumed criminal—all bearing the brunt of the criminal mind plagued by pale projection.

(via nezua)

CHURCH

(via peaceshine3)


In Jamie Oliver’s pampered mind it appears he thinks everyone has a farmer’s market just down the road. No-one has mobility problems, and so can easily drag home bags of shopping, even if the plebs don’t have a car. The electricity and gas required to slow cook cheap cuts of meat never runs out. Hard pressed single parents can simply pop out to browse the artisan stalls outside the local Poundstretcher, whilst pensioners should just pick up some cherry tomatoes and fresh fucking mussels at the off licence on the way home from the Bingo.


In Jamie Oliver’s pampered mind it appears he thinks everyone has a farmer’s market just down the road. No-one has mobility problems, and so can easily drag home bags of shopping, even if the plebs don’t have a car. The electricity and gas required to slow cook cheap cuts of meat never runs out. Hard pressed single parents can simply pop out to browse the artisan stalls outside the local Poundstretcher, whilst pensioners should just pick up some cherry tomatoes and fresh fucking mussels at the off licence on the way home from the Bingo.

Functionally Literate – Quote


Our suspicions are first aroused when we see that the self-declared apostles of ethics and of the ‘right to difference’ are clearly horrified by any vigorously sustained difference. For them, African customs are barbaric, Muslims are dreadful, the Chinese are totalitarian, and so on. As a matter of fact, this celebrated ‘other’ is acceptable only if he is a good other – which is to say what, exactly, if not the same as us? Respect for differences, of course! But on condition that the different be parliamentary-democratic, pro free-market economics, in favour of freedom of opinion, feminism, the environment… That is to say: I respect differences, but only, of course, in so far as that which differs also respects, just as I do, the said differences. Just as there can be ‘no freedom for the enemies of freedom’, so there can be no respect for those whose difference consists precisely in not respecting differences. To prove the point, just consider the obsessive resentment expressed by the partisans of ethics regarding anything that resembles an Islamic ‘fundamentalist’.

The problem is that the ‘respect for differences’ and the ethics of human rights do seem to define an identity! And that as a result, the respect for differences applies only to those differences that are reasonably consistent with this identity (which, after all is nothing other than the identity of a wealthy – albeit visibly declining – ‘West’). Even immigrants in this country [France], as seen by the partisans of ethics, are acceptably different only when they are ‘integrated’, only if they seek integration (which seems to mean, if you think about it: only if they want to suppress their difference). It might well be that ethical ideology, detached from the religious teachings which at least conferred upon it the fullness of a ‘revealed’ identity, is simply the final imperative of a conquering civilization: ‘Become  like me and I will respect your difference.’

Ethics An Essay on the Understanding of Evil, Alain Badiou p24

(1993, trans. 2001)

Functionally Literate – Opening Sentence.


Philisophy does not begin in an experience of wonder, as ancient tradition contends, but rather, I think, with the indeterminate but palpable sense that something desired has not been fulfilled, that a fantastic effort has failed.

Infinitely Demanding – Ethics of Commitment, Politics of Resistance, Simon Critchley (2007)

Culture of Illusion – On the Rare Reporting of WWII Allied War Crimes.


War makes monsters of us all and there were, no doubt, many instances where the Allies committed what would today be defined as war crimes. However, it seems to me that, given the horror that the Nazis perpetrated, we tend, in the West to overlook any evidence of our own terrible butchery.

Having just completed a reading of World War II by Martin Gilbert, a generally well written and factual account of the conflict, I have only managed to find one instance of allied action that could be counted as a war crime. Here is the very short passage in a very large book:

On the day of the Deptford rocket bomb, a British submarine, HMS Sturdy, on its way from Australia to Indonesian waters, stopped a Japanese cargo ship by surface shellfire. The Japanese crew having abandoned their ship, the only people left on board were fifty women and children, all of them Indonesians. In order to deny the Japanese any use of the ship’s cargo, the submarine commander ordered the ship to be sunk, despite a protest from the officer who had to lay the explosive charges. ‘Get on with it’, was the commander’s response. The cargo ship and its passengers were then blown up, together with the ship’s war supplies.

The Second World War – A Complete History, Martin Gilbert. p. 614

So a ship full of unarmed women and children were blown up. It is interesting to note how the author furnishes the commander with suitable justification for, what seems to be a heinous act. It was entirely okay for him to murder women and children because there were war supplies on the ship.

The date of this war crime, for war crime it surely appears, was November 25 1944.

There are few other examples in the book but given the size and scope of the war it seems unlikely that this is the only war crime on the allies side that went unpunished. In a fair and just world those who commit crimes would be prosecuted regardless on what side of the battle line there found themselves.

If the world was a just one then the author of this book might assign the same revulsion to this awful murder as he does, rightfully so, to the awful things that the Nazis did in the name of their Reich.

I think that these civilians were dismissed, by the commander and by the author, because they were Indonesian. I find it almost impossible to believe that had these civilians been upstanding members of the British Empire who understood the rules of cricket, had their tea at 4pm every day and had pale anglo-saxon skin that they would have suffered the same fate.

Maybe I am being terribly cynical though and I am unaware of many important facts concerning the fifth column nature of these Indonesian woman and children.

One day we will live in a world where we can acknowledge our own war crimes. That day does not seem to be today.

addendum: in my stupidity I overlooked the firebombing of Dresden, firebombing of Tokyo, the two nuclear bombs and any number of other “revenge” killings of German soldiers. However my aim with the small quote above was to highlight what seems like the slaughter of innocent women and children without the “luxury” of dropping bombs from a great height. The soldiers who committed this atrocity were actually on the boat laying the explosives. Whether they looked into the eyes of their victims or forced them, at gunpoint to stay on the boat, is not mentioned in the book.

Does anyone have any thoughts on this?

 

UPDATE: I found this link here – which says that apparently we won’t know for sure what happened until 2019 when the UK documents are unsealed. I can only assume that Mr. Gilbert had special access when he wrote his book.


Even though the derivation for the word Blighty, as a slang term for Britain, most likely comes from a corruption of the word vilayati, it is a source of amusement to me that blight is also a plant disease which is “a rapid and complete chlorosis, browning, then death of plant tissues such as leaves, branches, twigs, or floral organs”

What Britain did to her colonies, discuss.

Even though the derivation for the word Blighty, as a slang term for Britain, most likely comes from a corruption of the word vilayati, it is a source of amusement to me that blight is also a plant disease which is “a rapid and complete chlorosis, browning, then death of plant tissues such as leaves, branches, twigs, or floral organs”

What Britain did to her colonies, discuss.

Britain may be a small island but I would challenge anyone to find a country with a prouder history, a bigger heart or greater resilience. Britain is an island that helped to abolish slavery, that has invented most of the things worth inventing, including every sport currently played around the world. If I go on too long about our literature, our art, our philosophy, our contribution, including of course the world’s language — if I start talking about this ‘blessed plot, this sceptred isle, this England’ I might have to put it to music, so I think I’ll leave it there.

British prime minister David Cameron, in response to an alleged anonymous Russian diplomat referring to Britain as “a small island”.

Oversensitive much, Cameron? For a national leader to react with such defensive public fervour to an anonymous rumour? What a bunch of malarkey. Every country across the globe is proud of its history, heart, and resilience, as they should be — but few have caused as much human violence and suffering as Britain. Ask their neighbours, the Irish. 

Abolition of slavery? The rest of the world can barely stifle its laughter. That’s like a serial murderer being proud that at some point he stopped murdering people. The world’s language? To some extent true, but through violence, not linguistic merit, and still, more people speak Spanish or Chinese. Britain “invented most of the things worth inventing”? You mean, like gunpowder? Nope. Toothbrush? Nope. Books? Nope. Compass? Nope. Let’s not drag this out. Although, when it comes to pushing the envelope of organized racism and colonial violence, I will give Britain a tip of the hat.

Every sport currently played around the world? You mean, according to your own history books about yourselves. The Chinese were playing a form of football (soccer) 2,500 years ago; Persians were playing polo before Jesus was born; aboriginal peoples in North America were playing lacrosse and hockey since antiquity. Next joke. Setting your words to music? You mean music you lifted from Black US Americans, or you mean your own umpa-lumpa humpty-dumpty stuff with all the dynamic motion of the queen’s hand wave?

(via zuky)

Well, I needed to laugh today, so….

(via gallifreyglo)


Britain may be a small island but I would challenge anyone to find a country with a prouder history, a bigger heart or greater resilience. Britain is an island that helped to abolish slavery, that has invented most of the things worth inventing, including every sport currently played around the world. If I go on too long about our literature, our art, our philosophy, our contribution, including of course the world’s language — if I start talking about this ‘blessed plot, this sceptred isle, this England’ I might have to put it to music, so I think I’ll leave it there.

British prime minister David Cameron, in response to an alleged anonymous Russian diplomat referring to Britain as “a small island”.

Oversensitive much, Cameron? For a national leader to react with such defensive public fervour to an anonymous rumour? What a bunch of malarkey. Every country across the globe is proud of its history, heart, and resilience, as they should be — but few have caused as much human violence and suffering as Britain. Ask their neighbours, the Irish. 

Abolition of slavery? The rest of the world can barely stifle its laughter. That’s like a serial murderer being proud that at some point he stopped murdering people. The world’s language? To some extent true, but through violence, not linguistic merit, and still, more people speak Spanish or Chinese. Britain “invented most of the things worth inventing”? You mean, like gunpowder? Nope. Toothbrush? Nope. Books? Nope. Compass? Nope. Let’s not drag this out. Although, when it comes to pushing the envelope of organized racism and colonial violence, I will give Britain a tip of the hat.

Every sport currently played around the world? You mean, according to your own history books about yourselves. The Chinese were playing a form of football (soccer) 2,500 years ago; Persians were playing polo before Jesus was born; aboriginal peoples in North America were playing lacrosse and hockey since antiquity. Next joke. Setting your words to music? You mean music you lifted from Black US Americans, or you mean your own umpa-lumpa humpty-dumpty stuff with all the dynamic motion of the queen’s hand wave?

(via zuky)

Well, I needed to laugh today, so….

(via gallifreyglo)

Functionally Literate – Opening Sentence.


“Remember me to all my friends and relations – I wish you and others of the family as many as can write to me often and tell me about every thing and any thing,” Henry Watson begged his father, “about every body and thing I care any thing about.”

Ebony & Ivory – Race, Slavery and the Troubled History of America’s Universities, Craig Steven Wilder (2013)

Functionally Literate – Opening Sentence


Plane’s due to take off in a few minutes.

Brother West – Living and Loving Out Loud – A Memoir, Cornell West with David Ritz (2009)


My parents died years ago. I was very close to them. I still miss them terribly. I know I always will. I long to believe that their essence, their personalities, what I loved so much about them, are – really and truly – still in existence somewhere. […] Plainly, there’s something within me that’s ready to believe in life after death. And it’s not the least bit interested in whether there’s any sober evidence for it. So I don’t guffaw at the woman who visits her husband’s grave and chats him up every now and then, maybe on the anniversary of his death. It’s not hard to understand. And if I have difficulties with the ontological status of who she’s talking to, that’s all right. That’s not what this is about. This is about humans being human.

Carl Sagan on why sometimes it’s good to temporarily forgo your beliefs in order to respect someone else’s (via applepiesfromscratch)

Alternatively, Carl Sagan on (one of the reasons) why Richard Dawkins/many self-proclaimed atheists are assholes. (via imathers)

Sagan rules, Dawkins drools.

(via lakidaa)


My parents died years ago. I was very close to them. I still miss them terribly. I know I always will. I long to believe that their essence, their personalities, what I loved so much about them, are – really and truly – still in existence somewhere. […] Plainly, there’s something within me that’s ready to believe in life after death. And it’s not the least bit interested in whether there’s any sober evidence for it. So I don’t guffaw at the woman who visits her husband’s grave and chats him up every now and then, maybe on the anniversary of his death. It’s not hard to understand. And if I have difficulties with the ontological status of who she’s talking to, that’s all right. That’s not what this is about. This is about humans being human.

Carl Sagan on why sometimes it’s good to temporarily forgo your beliefs in order to respect someone else’s (via applepiesfromscratch)

Alternatively, Carl Sagan on (one of the reasons) why Richard Dawkins/many self-proclaimed atheists are assholes. (via imathers)

Sagan rules, Dawkins drools.

(via lakidaa)

Functionally Literate – Opening Sentence


We are a nation living with two sets of laws, one public law as guided by the Constitution and a second, invisible text that exists between the lines of that document.

American Coup – How A Terrified Government Is Destroying The Constitution, William M. Arkin (2013)

Functionally Literate – Opening Sentence.


In his magisterial work A Study of History, British historian Arnold J. Toynbee tells the story of how civilizations rise and fall through the dynamics of challenge and response.

Who Stole The American Dream?, Hedrick Smith (2013)


One of the symptoms of PDSD (Post-Disney Stress Disorder) is cultural theft where the cultura in question becomes nothing more than a prop and accessory for the wealthy ex-child star.

This could refer to any number of young, ignorant and usually white millionaires that Disney squeezes out every generation.

One of the symptoms of PDSD (Post-Disney Stress Disorder) is cultural theft where the cultura in question becomes nothing more than a prop and accessory for the wealthy ex-child star.

This could refer to any number of young, ignorant and usually white millionaires that Disney squeezes out every generation.

Functionally Literate – Opening Sentence


On January 30, 1835, as Andrew Jackson exited a congressman’s funeral, an assassin drew a weapon and pointed it at the president.

The United States of Paranoia, Jesse Walker (2013)

Functionally Literate – Opening Sentence


It is the beginning of the year of our Lord 1963.

Why We Can’t Wait, Martin Luther King Jr. (1964)

Functionally Literate – Opening Sentence


When my mother was pregnant with me, she told me later, a party of hooded Ku Klux Klan riders galloped up to our home in Omaha, Nebraska, one night.

The Autobiography of Malcom X As Told To Alex Haley, (1964)

Appetite for Distraction – Another Day.


He wakes up. He reads The Statement of Bradley Manning which looks like this:

The decisions that I made in 2010 were made out of a concern for my country and the world that we live in. Since the tragic events of 9/11, our country has been at war. We’ve been at war with an enemy that chooses not to meet us on any traditional battlefield, and due to this fact we’ve had to alter our methods of combating the risks posed to us and our way of life.

I initially agreed with these methods and chose to volunteer to help defend my country. It was not until I was in Iraq and reading secret military reports on a daily basis that I started to question the morality of what we were doing. It was at this time I realized in our efforts to meet this risk posed to us by the enemy, we have forgotten our humanity. We consciously elected to devalue human life both in Iraq and Afghanistan. When we engaged those that we perceived were the enemy, we sometimes killed innocent civilians. Whenever we killed innocent civilians, instead of accepting responsibility for our conduct, we elected to hide behind the veil of national security and classified information in order to avoid any public accountability.

In our zeal to kill the enemy, we internally debated the definition of torture. We held individuals at Guantanamo for years without due process. We inexplicably turned a blind eye to torture and executions by the Iraqi government. And we stomached countless other acts in the name of our war on terror.

Patriotism is often the cry extolled when morally questionable acts are advocated by those in power. When these cries of patriotism drown our any logically based intentions [unclear], it is usually an American soldier that is ordered to carry out some ill-conceived mission.

Our nation has had similar dark moments for the virtues of democracy—the Trail of Tears, the Dred Scott decision, McCarthyism, the Japanese-American internment camps—to name a few. I am confident that many of our actions since 9/11 will one day be viewed in a similar light.

As the late Howard Zinn once said, “There is not a flag large enough to cover the shame of killing innocent people.”

I understand that my actions violated the law, and I regret if my actions hurt anyone or harmed the United States. It was never my intention to hurt anyone. I only wanted to help people. When I chose to disclose classified information, I did so out of a love for my country and a sense of duty to others.

If you deny my request for a pardon, I will serve my time knowing that sometimes you have to pay a heavy price to live in a free society. I will gladly pay that price if it means we could have country that is truly conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all women and men are created equal.

Then he goes to sleep.


There should be no West, East, North and South just round and round and round and round.

Because we live on a fucking globe and we’re all stuck here until we can find a way to terraform and colonize Mars. We would be best served if we all got along with one another until that happens.

There should be no West, East, North and South just round and round and round and round.

Because we live on a fucking globe and we’re all stuck here until we can find a way to terraform and colonize Mars. We would be best served if we all got along with one another until that happens.

The word “like” on Facebook has
become to The Humans what the word “smurf” is to The Smurfs.

On seeing how many people have “liked” the apparent suicide of the actor who played Jett Jackson on Facebook tonight. I don’t think they mean to use the word “like”.

The word “like” on Facebook has
become to The Humans what the word “smurf” is to The Smurfs.

On seeing how many people have “liked” the apparent suicide of the actor who played Jett Jackson on Facebook tonight. I don’t think they mean to use the word “like”.

The argument that is often made in favour of The British Empire for ex-colonies is that “at least you weren’t run by the French, The Beligans, The Portuguese” but that seems very like a bully telling their victim “at least I only pushed your head down the toilet – the other bullies wanted to set fire to you and punch you in the face until you could no longer see.”

My point is that it seems like a false equivalence.

The argument that is often made in favour of The British Empire for ex-colonies is that “at least you weren’t run by the French, The Beligans, The Portuguese” but that seems very like a bully telling their victim “at least I only pushed your head down the toilet – the other bullies wanted to set fire to you and punch you in the face until you could no longer see.”

My point is that it seems like a false equivalence.

It reminds me of the “bike to work” movement. That is also portrayed as white, but in my city more than half of the people on bike are not white. I was once talking to a white activist who was photographing “bike commuters” and had only pictures of white people with the occasional “black professional” I asked her why she didn’t photograph the delivery people, construction workers etc. … ie. the black and Hispanic and Asian people… and she mumbled something about trying to “improve the image of biking” then admitted that she didn’t really see them as part of the “green movement” since they “probably have no choice” –

I was so mad I wanted to quit working on the project she and I were collaborating on.

So, in the same way when people in a poor neighborhood grow food in their yards … it’s just being poor– but when white people do it they are saving the earth or something.

comment left on the Racialiousblog post “Sustainable Food & Priviledge: Why is Green always White (and Male and Upper-Class)

(via kuroenigma)


It reminds me of the “bike to work” movement. That is also portrayed as white, but in my city more than half of the people on bike are not white. I was once talking to a white activist who was photographing “bike commuters” and had only pictures of white people with the occasional “black professional” I asked her why she didn’t photograph the delivery people, construction workers etc. … ie. the black and Hispanic and Asian people… and she mumbled something about trying to “improve the image of biking” then admitted that she didn’t really see them as part of the “green movement” since they “probably have no choice” –

I was so mad I wanted to quit working on the project she and I were collaborating on.

So, in the same way when people in a poor neighborhood grow food in their yards … it’s just being poor– but when white people do it they are saving the earth or something.

comment left on the Racialiousblog post “Sustainable Food & Priviledge: Why is Green always White (and Male and Upper-Class)

(via kuroenigma)


In America, when you are poor, you can instantly disappear like this into the subterranean rabbit holes of our vast jail and prison complex. You crawl out weeks, months or years later. You try to pick up where you left off. You avoid the cops. You look for work. There is no work. It is a constant cat-and-mouse game the state plays with the poor. The hunters. The hunted. The poor, no matter what they do, are always potential prey, minnows in a sea of sharks. It is not only the masses in the Middle East and the jihadists who despise us for our purported “values.” The vast, persecuted underclass, the human refuse callously cast aside by our corporate state, the legions of poor our bankrupt media have rendered invisible, the young, violent street toughs with no education, no jobs, no prospects also see through the empty rhetoric of the power elite when it speaks about our freedoms and democracy.

Chris Hedges (via azspot)

Chris Hedges is a raw wound of truth.

It hurts to read.


In America, when you are poor, you can instantly disappear like this into the subterranean rabbit holes of our vast jail and prison complex. You crawl out weeks, months or years later. You try to pick up where you left off. You avoid the cops. You look for work. There is no work. It is a constant cat-and-mouse game the state plays with the poor. The hunters. The hunted. The poor, no matter what they do, are always potential prey, minnows in a sea of sharks. It is not only the masses in the Middle East and the jihadists who despise us for our purported “values.” The vast, persecuted underclass, the human refuse callously cast aside by our corporate state, the legions of poor our bankrupt media have rendered invisible, the young, violent street toughs with no education, no jobs, no prospects also see through the empty rhetoric of the power elite when it speaks about our freedoms and democracy.

Chris Hedges (via azspot)

Chris Hedges is a raw wound of truth.

It hurts to read.


It’s a wrestling match of virtuality and actuality, an irruption of the physical into the digital. It’s all about Bradley shivering naked in his solitary cage, and Julian diligently typing in his book-lined closet at the embassy, and Ed bagging out behind the plastic seating of some airport, in a jetlag fit of black globalization that went on for a solid month.

And, those tiny, confined, somehow united spaces are the moral high ground. That’s where it is right now, that’s what it looks like these days.


It’s a wrestling match of virtuality and actuality, an irruption of the physical into the digital. It’s all about Bradley shivering naked in his solitary cage, and Julian diligently typing in his book-lined closet at the embassy, and Ed bagging out behind the plastic seating of some airport, in a jetlag fit of black globalization that went on for a solid month.

And, those tiny, confined, somehow united spaces are the moral high ground. That’s where it is right now, that’s what it looks like these days.


The Obama administration on Wednesday made public a previously classified order directing Verizon Communications to hand over a trove of Americans’ phone records just ahead of a Senate hearing scrutinizing the sweeping government surveillance programs.


The Obama administration on Wednesday made public a previously classified order directing Verizon Communications to hand over a trove of Americans’ phone records just ahead of a Senate hearing scrutinizing the sweeping government surveillance programs.