todaysdocument:

Police Report on Arrest of Rosa Parks

Sixty years ago on December 1, 1955, during a typical evening rush hour in Montgomery, Alabama, a 42 year-old woman took a seat near the front of the bus on her way home from the Montgomery Fair department store where she worked as a seamstress. Refusing to yield her seat to a white passenger when instructed by the bus driver, police were called and she was arrested.

The police report shows that Rosa Parks was charged with “refusing to obey orders of bus driver.” According to the report, she was taken to the police station, where she was booked, fingerprinted, and briefly incarcerated.

The event touched off a 381-day boycott of the Montgomery, Alabama, bus system in which a 26-year-old unknown minister, Martin Luther King, Jr., emerged as the leader.

Police Report, Fingerprint Card, and Bus Diagram
From: File Unit: Aurelia S. Browder et al. v. W. A. Gayle et al., No. 1147, 9/1938 – 11/26/1968Series: Civil Cases, 9/1938 – 11/26/1968Record Group 21: Records of District Courts of the United States, 1685 – 2009

Scope & Content note:
This case file contains documents resulting from a Federal court suit that challenged segregation within Montgomery, Alabama’s public transportation system. The case is renowned for its relation to the 1955 bus boycott in Montgomery, a pivotal event in the Civil Rights Movement. Although not a party to the case, Rosa Parks’ arrest record and fingerprints are exhibits to the case. The plaintiffs in this case were Aurelia Browder, Susie McDonald, Claudette Colvin, and Mary Louise Smith, all of whom had been either arrested for refusing to give up their seats to white passengers or harmed by being forced to comply with segregation codes. In this case, the three – judge panel ruled Montgomery segregation codes unconstitutional due to their violation of the due process and equal protection clauses of the 14th Amendment. The U.S. Supreme Court later affirmed the District Court’s judgment.

Documenting history with documents.


todaysdocument:

Police Report on Arrest of Rosa Parks

Sixty years ago on December 1, 1955, during a typical evening rush hour in Montgomery, Alabama, a 42 year-old woman took a seat near the front of the bus on her way home from the Montgomery Fair department store where she worked as a seamstress. Refusing to yield her seat to a white passenger when instructed by the bus driver, police were called and she was arrested.

The police report shows that Rosa Parks was charged with “refusing to obey orders of bus driver.” According to the report, she was taken to the police station, where she was booked, fingerprinted, and briefly incarcerated.

The event touched off a 381-day boycott of the Montgomery, Alabama, bus system in which a 26-year-old unknown minister, Martin Luther King, Jr., emerged as the leader.

Police Report, Fingerprint Card, and Bus Diagram
From: File Unit: Aurelia S. Browder et al. v. W. A. Gayle et al., No. 1147, 9/1938 – 11/26/1968Series: Civil Cases, 9/1938 – 11/26/1968Record Group 21: Records of District Courts of the United States, 1685 – 2009

Scope & Content note:
This case file contains documents resulting from a Federal court suit that challenged segregation within Montgomery, Alabama’s public transportation system. The case is renowned for its relation to the 1955 bus boycott in Montgomery, a pivotal event in the Civil Rights Movement. Although not a party to the case, Rosa Parks’ arrest record and fingerprints are exhibits to the case. The plaintiffs in this case were Aurelia Browder, Susie McDonald, Claudette Colvin, and Mary Louise Smith, all of whom had been either arrested for refusing to give up their seats to white passengers or harmed by being forced to comply with segregation codes. In this case, the three – judge panel ruled Montgomery segregation codes unconstitutional due to their violation of the due process and equal protection clauses of the 14th Amendment. The U.S. Supreme Court later affirmed the District Court’s judgment.

Documenting history with documents.


nevver:

Wish you were here, Sad Topographies


nevver:

Wish you were here, Sad Topographies


theartofanimation:

Alice X. Zhang  –  http://alicexz.deviantart.com  –  https://www.facebook.com/alicexz.art  –  http://alicexz.tumblr.com  –  https://society6.com/alicexz  –  https://twitter.com/alicexz  –  https://www.youtube.com/user/alicexzart  –  http://www.inprnt.com/gallery/alicexz  –  https://instagram.com/alicexz


museumuesum:

Squeak Carnwath

A Little Love, 2014
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 30 x 30 in.

Love, 2014
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 70 x 70 in.

Girls, 2015
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 75 x 75 in.

Sad Alone, 2015
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 80 x 80 in.

Frank, 2014
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 70 x 70 in.

Bobby, 2015
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel
30 x 30 in.

Ray, 2015
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 75 x 75 in.

Ray of Light, 2015
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 30 x 30 in.


museumuesum:

Squeak Carnwath

A Little Love, 2014
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 30 x 30 in.

Love, 2014
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 70 x 70 in.

Girls, 2015
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 75 x 75 in.

Sad Alone, 2015
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 80 x 80 in.

Frank, 2014
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 70 x 70 in.

Bobby, 2015
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel
30 x 30 in.

Ray, 2015
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 75 x 75 in.

Ray of Light, 2015
Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 30 x 30 in.


invisiblelad:

revolutionarykoolaid:

Last Night in Ferguson (8.11.15): Shit continues to be fucked up. The police continue to outright assault protesters and make indiscriminate arrests. A year later, the police are also no better at de-escalating tensions. And then, the Oath Keepers showed up… who the fuck and why?! Overall, nearly 150 protesters were arrested yesterday in Ferguson/St Louis. #staywoke #farfromover

If you ever want evidence of what it is to operate in a police state; where suppression of journalists, squelching of public assembly and peaceful protest are shrugged off and or encouraged by “tyranny fearing” armed militiamen who help do it… this is American dystopia. 

The human rights nightmare that was bad enough the first time. Now its just obvious that nothing whatsoever has changed. 


invisiblelad:

revolutionarykoolaid:

Last Night in Ferguson (8.11.15): Shit continues to be fucked up. The police continue to outright assault protesters and make indiscriminate arrests. A year later, the police are also no better at de-escalating tensions. And then, the Oath Keepers showed up… who the fuck and why?! Overall, nearly 150 protesters were arrested yesterday in Ferguson/St Louis. #staywoke #farfromover

If you ever want evidence of what it is to operate in a police state; where suppression of journalists, squelching of public assembly and peaceful protest are shrugged off and or encouraged by “tyranny fearing” armed militiamen who help do it… this is American dystopia. 

The human rights nightmare that was bad enough the first time. Now its just obvious that nothing whatsoever has changed. 


ultrafacts:

1017sosa300:

machine-factory:

unbelievable micro-sulptures by Willard Wigan that sit within the eye of a needle, or on a pin head. The pieces are so minute that they are only visible through a microscope. Willard enters a meditative state in which his heartbeat is slowed, allowing him to reduce hand tremors and sculpt between pulse beats.

It began when I was five years old,” says Willard. “I started making houses for ants because I thought they needed somewhere to live. Then I made them shoes and hats. It was a fantasy world I escaped to where my dyslexia didn’t hold me back and my teachers couldn’t criticise me. That’s how my career as a micro-sculptor began

image
image
image
image

ultrafacts:

1017sosa300:

machine-factory:

unbelievable micro-sulptures by Willard Wigan that sit within the eye of a needle, or on a pin head. The pieces are so minute that they are only visible through a microscope. Willard enters a meditative state in which his heartbeat is slowed, allowing him to reduce hand tremors and sculpt between pulse beats.

It began when I was five years old,” says Willard. “I started making houses for ants because I thought they needed somewhere to live. Then I made them shoes and hats. It was a fantasy world I escaped to where my dyslexia didn’t hold me back and my teachers couldn’t criticise me. That’s how my career as a micro-sculptor began

image
image
image
image

black-culture:

jared-jackson:

I now have prints available in multiple sizes!!

 http://society6.com/jared_jackson/prints

http://society6.com/jared_jackson/prints

To anyone that buys take a picture when you receive your print and tag me so I can reblog it and personally say thanks 🙂

boooost!!

ABOUT TIME!!!

DC with Pakistan.


image

image

image

image

Last night there was a well attended gathering at Du Pont Circle in Washington DC. Many faiths, ethnicities and ages all came together to remember those who had been massacred at their school desks in Peshawar the day before.

Candles were lit. Heads were bowed. Tears were shed.

The memory of those murdered at weddings and in their homes by drones and by death squads danced round the edge of the memorial.

All the innocents have value and all were joined in hoping for a better world for those innocents who remain.


richard-miles-archaeologist:

Archaeology: A Secret History – BBC Four

Episode 2 “The Search for Civilisation”

During excavations in Mesopotamia in the 1850s, thousands of photographs were taken of cuneiform tablets which had been found there. The inscriptions were written in a mysterious language which nobody yet understood. The photographs were distributed all over Europe, and all of its finest scholars quickly got to work, in a race to try and decipher this mysterious code.

The French-German scholar Julius Oppert (together with other 19th century Assyriologists) made decisive contributions to the decipherment of cuneiform inscriptions. In 1855, he published Écriture Anarienne, advancing the theory that the language spoken originally in Assyria belonged to the Ural-Altaic group (non-Semitic) and he classified it as Casdo-Scythian. In 1869 he renamed it Sumerian language -based on the known title “King of Sumer and Akkad”, reasoning that if Akkad signified the Semitic portion of the kingdom, Sumer might describe the non-Semitic annex-. He also asserted that the entire system of cuneiform writing was Sumerian in origin

Sumerian is generally regarded as a language isolate (a language that has no known historical or linguistic relationship to any other language family) and is the oldest written language in existence. Sumerian was spoken in Sumer, in southern Mesopotamia, from perhaps the 4th millennium BC and it flourished during the 3rd millennium BC. Sumerian was replaced as a spoken language by Semitic Akkadian (Assyro-Babylonian) but continued in written usage almost to the end of the life of the Akkadian language, around the beginning of the Christian era.

Some of the very first pictures of cuneiform tablets took during excavations in Mesopotamia in the 1850s

French National Archives, Paris, France


richard-miles-archaeologist:

Archaeology: A Secret History – BBC Four

Episode 2 “The Search for Civilisation”

During excavations in Mesopotamia in the 1850s, thousands of photographs were taken of cuneiform tablets which had been found there. The inscriptions were written in a mysterious language which nobody yet understood. The photographs were distributed all over Europe, and all of its finest scholars quickly got to work, in a race to try and decipher this mysterious code.

The French-German scholar Julius Oppert (together with other 19th century Assyriologists) made decisive contributions to the decipherment of cuneiform inscriptions. In 1855, he published Écriture Anarienne, advancing the theory that the language spoken originally in Assyria belonged to the Ural-Altaic group (non-Semitic) and he classified it as Casdo-Scythian. In 1869 he renamed it Sumerian language -based on the known title “King of Sumer and Akkad”, reasoning that if Akkad signified the Semitic portion of the kingdom, Sumer might describe the non-Semitic annex-. He also asserted that the entire system of cuneiform writing was Sumerian in origin

Sumerian is generally regarded as a language isolate (a language that has no known historical or linguistic relationship to any other language family) and is the oldest written language in existence. Sumerian was spoken in Sumer, in southern Mesopotamia, from perhaps the 4th millennium BC and it flourished during the 3rd millennium BC. Sumerian was replaced as a spoken language by Semitic Akkadian (Assyro-Babylonian) but continued in written usage almost to the end of the life of the Akkadian language, around the beginning of the Christian era.

Some of the very first pictures of cuneiform tablets took during excavations in Mesopotamia in the 1850s

French National Archives, Paris, France


huffingtonpost:

Columbia University Student Will Drag Her Mattress Around Campus Until Her Rapist Is Gone

“I think the act of carrying something that is normally found in our bedroom out into the light is supposed to mirror the way I’ve talked to the media and talked to different news channels, etc,” Emma continues in the full video which you can watch here. 


huffingtonpost:

Columbia University Student Will Drag Her Mattress Around Campus Until Her Rapist Is Gone

“I think the act of carrying something that is normally found in our bedroom out into the light is supposed to mirror the way I’ve talked to the media and talked to different news channels, etc,” Emma continues in the full video which you can watch here. 


letmypeopleshow:

Jewish Museum Show Spotlights 2 Abstract Expressionist Masters Who Were Left Out of Spotlight (Maybe Because They Were Black and Female?)

She was born in 1908 to Russian parents was raised in Brooklyn.

He was born in 1909 to immigrants from Bermuda, and grew up in Harlem.

Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis both studied art in New York, explored Social Realism in their work with the Federal Art Project, and refined their personal abstract language in the ’40s and ’50s. They both developed signature styles that summon classic elements of Abstract Expressionism, playing with gesture and color and line that almost resolves into writing. And both had shows in prestigious New York galleries.

But the two artists, the black man and the Jewish woman best known as Jackson Pollock’s wife, shared another quality: few people wrote about their work.

“A noticeable lack of critical reception” is how Norman Kleeblatt, chief curator at the Jewish Museum, puts it in the catalogue for “From the Margins,” an exhibition featuring paintings the two artists made between 1945 and ‘52.

The show, opening September 12, creates a suggestive painterly conversation, at times articulated in the rhythms of early Modernism, Hebrew and bebop.

And it reminds us that the story of Abstract Expressionism is still being written. 


letmypeopleshow:

Jewish Museum Show Spotlights 2 Abstract Expressionist Masters Who Were Left Out of Spotlight (Maybe Because They Were Black and Female?)

She was born in 1908 to Russian parents was raised in Brooklyn.

He was born in 1909 to immigrants from Bermuda, and grew up in Harlem.

Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis both studied art in New York, explored Social Realism in their work with the Federal Art Project, and refined their personal abstract language in the ’40s and ’50s. They both developed signature styles that summon classic elements of Abstract Expressionism, playing with gesture and color and line that almost resolves into writing. And both had shows in prestigious New York galleries.

But the two artists, the black man and the Jewish woman best known as Jackson Pollock’s wife, shared another quality: few people wrote about their work.

“A noticeable lack of critical reception” is how Norman Kleeblatt, chief curator at the Jewish Museum, puts it in the catalogue for “From the Margins,” an exhibition featuring paintings the two artists made between 1945 and ‘52.

The show, opening September 12, creates a suggestive painterly conversation, at times articulated in the rhythms of early Modernism, Hebrew and bebop.

And it reminds us that the story of Abstract Expressionism is still being written. 


koreaunderground:

globalpoetics:

The Violent Xenophobic Racism in Ireland

At 9pm last Tuesday, 44-year-old Chinese doctor, Wu Youzhong, went to investigate the sound of breaking glass outside his home in Coleraine, County Londonderry, in Ireland. When he arrived at his front door, he saw that the window had been smashed. An intruder then attacked him so violently that he had to be admitted to hospital for several days, and required consultation from an eye specialist. Dr Wu’s wife, Luo Ruoyin, said, “I heard he was just screaming in pain and I was scared. He was just holding his head and covering his eyes and blood was just running down everywhere.” The police are treating the attack as racially motivated; the couple, who have a two-year-old daughter, are reported to be intending to move away from the area.

The Chinese community in Ireland has long been a target of racial discrimination. Anna Lo, an Alliance Party politician born in Hong Kong who was elected to the Ireland Assembly in 2007, was the first politician from an ethnic minority at national level in Ireland, as well as the first East Asian to be elected anywhere in Britain. Her campaign was dogged by violent racism – including death threats – to the extent that she had to carry a panic alarm as a precaution. One far-Right website published pornographic images of Chinese women, alongside derogatory references to Anna Lo. “People from ethnic minorities are very frightened,” she said. “I have never seen ethnic minorities so fearful in Ireland.”

Read More: http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/jakewallissimons/100181659/sectarian-hatred-is-being-overtaken-by-xenophobic-racism-in-northern-ireland/

the crumbling myth of white supremacy. white supremacy is violent. white supremacy is destructive. white supremacy is pervasive. white supremacy kills.


koreaunderground:

globalpoetics:

The Violent Xenophobic Racism in Ireland

At 9pm last Tuesday, 44-year-old Chinese doctor, Wu Youzhong, went to investigate the sound of breaking glass outside his home in Coleraine, County Londonderry, in Ireland. When he arrived at his front door, he saw that the window had been smashed. An intruder then attacked him so violently that he had to be admitted to hospital for several days, and required consultation from an eye specialist. Dr Wu’s wife, Luo Ruoyin, said, “I heard he was just screaming in pain and I was scared. He was just holding his head and covering his eyes and blood was just running down everywhere.” The police are treating the attack as racially motivated; the couple, who have a two-year-old daughter, are reported to be intending to move away from the area.

The Chinese community in Ireland has long been a target of racial discrimination. Anna Lo, an Alliance Party politician born in Hong Kong who was elected to the Ireland Assembly in 2007, was the first politician from an ethnic minority at national level in Ireland, as well as the first East Asian to be elected anywhere in Britain. Her campaign was dogged by violent racism – including death threats – to the extent that she had to carry a panic alarm as a precaution. One far-Right website published pornographic images of Chinese women, alongside derogatory references to Anna Lo. “People from ethnic minorities are very frightened,” she said. “I have never seen ethnic minorities so fearful in Ireland.”

Read More: http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/jakewallissimons/100181659/sectarian-hatred-is-being-overtaken-by-xenophobic-racism-in-northern-ireland/

the crumbling myth of white supremacy. white supremacy is violent. white supremacy is destructive. white supremacy is pervasive. white supremacy kills.


unhistorical:

Interviewer: But the question is more, how do you get there? Do you get there by confrontation, violence?

Davis: Oh, is that the question you were asking? Yeah see, that’s another thing. When you talk about a revolution, most people think violence, without realizing that the real content of any revolutionary thrust lies in the principles and the goals that you’re striving for, not in the way you reach them. On the other hand, because of the way this society’s organized, because of the violence that exists on the surface everywhere, you have to expect that there are going to be such explosions. You have to expect things like that as reactions. If you are a black person and live in the black community all your life and walk out on the street everyday seeing white policemen surrounding you… when I was living in Los Angeles, for instance, long before the situation in L.A ever occurred, I was constantly stopped. No, the police didn’t know who I was. But I was a black women and I had a natural and they, I suppose thought I might be “militant.”

And when you live under a situation like that constantly, and then you ask me, you know, whether I approve of violence. I mean, that just doesn’t make any sense at all. Whether I approve of guns.

I grew up in Birmingham, Alabama. Some very, very good friends of mine were killed by bombs, bombs that were planted by racists. I remember, from the time I was very small, I remember the sounds of bombs exploding across the street. Our house shaking. I remember my father having to have guns at his disposal at all times, because of the fact that, at any moment, we might expect to be attacked. The man who was, at that time, in complete control of the city government, his name was Bull Connor, would often get on the radio and make statements like, “Niggers have moved into a white neighborhood. We better expect some bloodshed tonight.” And sure enough, there would be bloodshed. After the four young girls who lived, one of them lived next door to me…I was very good friends with the sister of another one. My sister was very good friends with all three of them. My mother taught one of them in her class. My mother—in fact, when the bombing occurred, one of the mothers of one of the young girls called my mother and said, “Can you take me down to the church to pick up Carol? We heard about the bombing and I don’t have my car.” And they went down and what did they find? They found limbs and heads strewn all over the place. And then, after that, in my neighborhood, all the men organized themselves into an armed patrol. They had to take their guns and patrol our community every night because they did not want that to happen again.

Angela Davis on violence and revolution (1972)


unhistorical:

Interviewer: But the question is more, how do you get there? Do you get there by confrontation, violence?

Davis: Oh, is that the question you were asking? Yeah see, that’s another thing. When you talk about a revolution, most people think violence, without realizing that the real content of any revolutionary thrust lies in the principles and the goals that you’re striving for, not in the way you reach them. On the other hand, because of the way this society’s organized, because of the violence that exists on the surface everywhere, you have to expect that there are going to be such explosions. You have to expect things like that as reactions. If you are a black person and live in the black community all your life and walk out on the street everyday seeing white policemen surrounding you… when I was living in Los Angeles, for instance, long before the situation in L.A ever occurred, I was constantly stopped. No, the police didn’t know who I was. But I was a black women and I had a natural and they, I suppose thought I might be “militant.”

And when you live under a situation like that constantly, and then you ask me, you know, whether I approve of violence. I mean, that just doesn’t make any sense at all. Whether I approve of guns.

I grew up in Birmingham, Alabama. Some very, very good friends of mine were killed by bombs, bombs that were planted by racists. I remember, from the time I was very small, I remember the sounds of bombs exploding across the street. Our house shaking. I remember my father having to have guns at his disposal at all times, because of the fact that, at any moment, we might expect to be attacked. The man who was, at that time, in complete control of the city government, his name was Bull Connor, would often get on the radio and make statements like, “Niggers have moved into a white neighborhood. We better expect some bloodshed tonight.” And sure enough, there would be bloodshed. After the four young girls who lived, one of them lived next door to me…I was very good friends with the sister of another one. My sister was very good friends with all three of them. My mother taught one of them in her class. My mother—in fact, when the bombing occurred, one of the mothers of one of the young girls called my mother and said, “Can you take me down to the church to pick up Carol? We heard about the bombing and I don’t have my car.” And they went down and what did they find? They found limbs and heads strewn all over the place. And then, after that, in my neighborhood, all the men organized themselves into an armed patrol. They had to take their guns and patrol our community every night because they did not want that to happen again.

Angela Davis on violence and revolution (1972)