yahoopolitics:

HuffPo made you a super cut of politicians on “What Makes America Great”

This video is what makes America great. I love you America. You are mental like a crazy Uncle.


yahoopolitics:

HuffPo made you a super cut of politicians on “What Makes America Great”

This video is what makes America great. I love you America. You are mental like a crazy Uncle.

Lessons from the past #23


(I stole this thought from another blog that I barely use)

As I happened to be reading Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, this Sunday morning, I came across a passage that resonated as regards the current and approaching Circus. Here I share it with you now:

For a long while before the appointed time is at hand the election becomes the most important and the all-engrossing topic of discussion. The ardor of faction is redoubled; and all the artificial passions which the imagination can create in the bosom of a happy and peaceful land are agitated and brought to light. The President, on the other hand, is absorbed by the cares of self-defence. He no longer governs for the interest of the State, but for that of his re-election; he does homage to the majority, and instead of checking its passions, as his duty commands him to do, he frequently courts its worst caprices. As the election draws near, the activity of intrigue and the agitation of the populace increase; the citizens are divided into hostile camps, each of which assumes the name of its favorite candidate; the whole nation glows with feverish excitement; the election is the daily theme of the public papers, the subject of private conversation, the end of every thought and every action , the sole interest of the present. As soon as the choice is determined, this ardor is dispelled; and as a calmer season returns, the current of the State, which had nearly broken its banks, sinks to its usual level: but who can refrain from astonishment at the causes of the storm.

Thus do we continue to return to the thing that we try to escape from.

Lessons from the past #23


(I stole this thought from another blog that I barely use)

As I happened to be reading Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, this Sunday morning, I came across a passage that resonated as regards the current and approaching Circus. Here I share it with you now:

For a long while before the appointed time is at hand the election becomes the most important and the all-engrossing topic of discussion. The ardor of faction is redoubled; and all the artificial passions which the imagination can create in the bosom of a happy and peaceful land are agitated and brought to light. The President, on the other hand, is absorbed by the cares of self-defence. He no longer governs for the interest of the State, but for that of his re-election; he does homage to the majority, and instead of checking its passions, as his duty commands him to do, he frequently courts its worst caprices. As the election draws near, the activity of intrigue and the agitation of the populace increase; the citizens are divided into hostile camps, each of which assumes the name of its favorite candidate; the whole nation glows with feverish excitement; the election is the daily theme of the public papers, the subject of private conversation, the end of every thought and every action , the sole interest of the present. As soon as the choice is determined, this ardor is dispelled; and as a calmer season returns, the current of the State, which had nearly broken its banks, sinks to its usual level: but who can refrain from astonishment at the causes of the storm.

Thus do we continue to return to the thing that we try to escape from.


Lest we forget, in the juggernaut one body, two headed political system of big business, that there are other parties out there, vying for votes they will never get with energy that will never be appreciated. Here, today, Stewart Alexander, representing the Socialist Party of America. Here is his platform. Watch as it is crushed and ignored. So sad. 

Here, for the few who follow this blog, is their dream for a better tomorrow:

A man can dream, a man can dream.

  1. Genuine democracy for the 99%
  2. Free speech, press, assembly, association
  3. An end to wars and military occupation
  4. Bring the troops and the money home
  5. Initiate global disarmament
  6. Deploy our troops for disaster relief
  7. Create a democratically-controlled national bank
  8. End Bush-Obama tax cuts to the wealthy
  9. Productive jobs and/or a living wage for all
  10. Single payer universal health care
  11. Free dental, mental, optical and long term care
  12. Decent affordable housing for all
  13. Free or inexpensive reliable public transit
  14. Hire more teachers – Reduce classroom size
  15. Free education through college level
  16. Legalize and tax marijuana – End the drug war
  17. Restore our air, water, land – Protect the environment
  18. Rebuild America’s infrastructure

Lest we forget, in the juggernaut one body, two headed political system of big business, that there are other parties out there, vying for votes they will never get with energy that will never be appreciated. Here, today, Stewart Alexander, representing the Socialist Party of America. Here is his platform. Watch as it is crushed and ignored. So sad. 

Here, for the few who follow this blog, is their dream for a better tomorrow:

A man can dream, a man can dream.

  1. Genuine democracy for the 99%
  2. Free speech, press, assembly, association
  3. An end to wars and military occupation
  4. Bring the troops and the money home
  5. Initiate global disarmament
  6. Deploy our troops for disaster relief
  7. Create a democratically-controlled national bank
  8. End Bush-Obama tax cuts to the wealthy
  9. Productive jobs and/or a living wage for all
  10. Single payer universal health care
  11. Free dental, mental, optical and long term care
  12. Decent affordable housing for all
  13. Free or inexpensive reliable public transit
  14. Hire more teachers – Reduce classroom size
  15. Free education through college level
  16. Legalize and tax marijuana – End the drug war
  17. Restore our air, water, land – Protect the environment
  18. Rebuild America’s infrastructure

One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors.

Little bit of Plato for the afternoon.

One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors.

Little bit of Plato for the afternoon.

ryking:

17 Of The Top 20 Biggest Political Donors This Election Cycle Are [Right-wingers]

Egged on in no small part by the Supreme Court’s decision to turn campaign finance into the wild west, a small group of donors have gotten increasing aggressive in their efforts to us their enormous wealth to influence elections. As Mother Jones lays out, this has given a decided advantage to Republicans and [other right-wing] candidates. Seventeen of the top 20 spenders seeking to buy election results are [right-wingers]…

mundusnovus

ONE DOLLAR ONE VOTE… GAAAAAH.


ryking:

17 Of The Top 20 Biggest Political Donors This Election Cycle Are [Right-wingers]

Egged on in no small part by the Supreme Court’s decision to turn campaign finance into the wild west, a small group of donors have gotten increasing aggressive in their efforts to us their enormous wealth to influence elections. As Mother Jones lays out, this has given a decided advantage to Republicans and [other right-wing] candidates. Seventeen of the top 20 spenders seeking to buy election results are [right-wingers]…

mundusnovus

ONE DOLLAR ONE VOTE… GAAAAAH.

Books to warm the political soul


So many books so little time. Here are a few books that perfectly capture the flavour and passion that American Politics engenders. I enjoyed them. I hope you do too.

  1. Democracy in America: Everything you need to know about how little everything has changed.
  2. Primary Colors: Insights into a “fictional” Democratic Primary and the treasures therein.
  3. Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, McCain and Palin, and the Race of a Lifetime: Melodrama, soap opera, tele-novella. Reality, once again, trumps fiction.
  4. Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail ‘72: Gonzo peels the flesh off the bones.

Books to warm the political soul


So many books so little time. Here are a few books that perfectly capture the flavour and passion that American Politics engenders. I enjoyed them. I hope you do too.

  1. Democracy in America: Everything you need to know about how little everything has changed.
  2. Primary Colors: Insights into a “fictional” Democratic Primary and the treasures therein.
  3. Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, McCain and Palin, and the Race of a Lifetime: Melodrama, soap opera, tele-novella. Reality, once again, trumps fiction.
  4. Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail ‘72: Gonzo peels the flesh off the bones.

Lest we forget about the others because The Republicans are getting all of the press. Pity the poor Libertarian for he too needs attention. Click on him here. He is an Iron Man.


Lest we forget about the others because The Republicans are getting all of the press. Pity the poor Libertarian for he too needs attention. Click on him here. He is an Iron Man.

It all starts tomorrow, apparently…


Even though it’s actually been going on for almost a year already after the illusive break that occurred after the last election. Ouroboros

continues it’s unhappy feast. Good luck everyone!

(This is a reference to the neverending election cycle in US Presidential Politics, just in case I was being too opaque. Actually, now that I think of it, the Ourobouros does look a lot like the fluffy dragon in the movie The Neverending Story. I think that this is probably a coincidence.)

It all starts tomorrow, apparently…


Even though it’s actually been going on for almost a year already after the illusive break that occurred after the last election. Ouroboros

continues it’s unhappy feast. Good luck everyone!

(This is a reference to the neverending election cycle in US Presidential Politics, just in case I was being too opaque. Actually, now that I think of it, the Ourobouros does look a lot like the fluffy dragon in the movie The Neverending Story. I think that this is probably a coincidence.)

An exclusive club of 203…


It is a delight to see that so many worthy Americans have filed Statements of Candidacy for the 2012 Presidential race. My favourite today, at number 22, is President Emperor Caesar. He should win three times over.

The Criteria for all of these fine folks?:

1. The individual has received contributions aggregating in excess of $5,000 or made expenditures aggregating in excess of $5,000

or

2. The individual has given consent to another person to receive contributions or make expenditures on behalf of him or herself and that person has received contributions aggregating in excess of $5,000 or made expenditures aggregating in excess of $5,000

What about those serious people who can’t raise $5,000? It seems so unfair. Call Congress. Call your Governor. Impeach something.

An exclusive club of 203…

An exclusive club of 203…


It is a delight to see that so many worthy Americans have filed Statements of Candidacy for the 2012 Presidential race. My favourite today, at number 22, is President Emperor Caesar. He should win three times over.

The Criteria for all of these fine folks?:

1. The individual has received contributions aggregating in excess of $5,000 or made expenditures aggregating in excess of $5,000

or

2. The individual has given consent to another person to receive contributions or make expenditures on behalf of him or herself and that person has received contributions aggregating in excess of $5,000 or made expenditures aggregating in excess of $5,000

What about those serious people who can’t raise $5,000? It seems so unfair. Call Congress. Call your Governor. Impeach something.

An exclusive club of 203…


ANTONY
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious:
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answer’d it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest–
For Brutus is an honourable man;
So are they all, all honourable men–
Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
But Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
He hath brought many captives home to Rome
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:
Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept:
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And, sure, he is an honourable man.
I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause:
What cause withholds you then, to mourn for him?
O judgment! thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason. Bear with me;
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me.

First Citizen
Methinks there is much reason in his sayings.

Second Citizen
If thou consider rightly of the matter,
Caesar has had great wrong.

Third Citizen
Has he, masters?
I fear there will a worse come in his place.

Fourth Citizen
Mark’d ye his words? He would not take the crown;
Therefore ‘tis certain he was not ambitious.

First Citizen
If it be found so, some will dear abide it.

Second Citizen
Poor soul! his eyes are red as fire with weeping.

Third Citizen
There’s not a nobler man in Rome than Antony.

Fourth Citizen
Now mark him, he begins again to speak.

ANTONY
But yesterday the word of Caesar might
Have stood against the world; now lies he there.
And none so poor to do him reverence.
O masters, if I were disposed to stir
Your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage,
I should do Brutus wrong, and Cassius wrong,
Who, you all know, are honourable men:
I will not do them wrong; I rather choose
To wrong the dead, to wrong myself and you,
Than I will wrong such honourable men.
But here’s a parchment with the seal of Caesar;
I found it in his closet, ’tis his will:
Let but the commons hear this testament–
Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read–
And they would go and kiss dead Caesar’s wounds
And dip their napkins in his sacred blood,
Yea, beg a hair of him for memory,
And, dying, mention it within their wills,
Bequeathing it as a rich legacy
Unto their issue.

Fourth Citizen
We’ll hear the will: read it, Mark Antony.

All
The will, the will! we will hear Caesar’s will.

ANTONY
Have patience, gentle friends, I must not read it;
It is not meet you know how Caesar loved you.
You are not wood, you are not stones, but men;
And, being men, bearing the will of Caesar,
It will inflame you, it will make you mad:
‘Tis good you know not that you are his heirs;
For, if you should, O, what would come of it!

Fourth Citizen
Read the will; we’ll hear it, Antony;
You shall read us the will, Caesar’s will.

ANTONY
Will you be patient? will you stay awhile?
I have o’ershot myself to tell you of it:
I fear I wrong the honourable men
Whose daggers have stabb’d Caesar; I do fear it.

Fourth Citizen
They were traitors: honourable men!

All
The will! the testament!

Second Citizen
They were villains, murderers: the will! read the will.

ANTONY
You will compel me, then, to read the will?
Then make a ring about the corpse of Caesar,
And let me show you him that made the will.
Shall I descend? and will you give me leave?

Several Citizens
Come down.

Second Citizen
Descend.

Third Citizen
You shall have leave.

ANTONY comes down

Fourth Citizen
A ring; stand round.

First Citizen
Stand from the hearse, stand from the body.

Second Citizen
Room for Antony, most noble Antony.

ANTONY
Nay, press not so upon me; stand far off.

Several Citizens
Stand back; room; bear back.

ANTONY
If you have tears, prepare to shed them now.
You all do know this mantle: I remember
The first time ever Caesar put it on;
‘Twas on a summer’s evening, in his tent,
That day he overcame the Nervii:
Look, in this place ran Cassius’ dagger through:
See what a rent the envious Casca made:
Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabb’d;
And as he pluck’d his cursed steel away,
Mark how the blood of Caesar follow’d it,
As rushing out of doors, to be resolved
If Brutus so unkindly knock’d, or no;
For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar’s angel:
Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him!
This was the most unkindest cut of all;
For when the noble Caesar saw him stab,
Ingratitude, more strong than traitors’ arms,
Quite vanquish’d him: then burst his mighty heart;
And, in his mantle muffling up his face,
Even at the base of Pompey’s statua,
Which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell.
O, what a fall was there, my countrymen!
Then I, and you, and all of us fell down,
Whilst bloody treason flourish’d over us.
O, now you weep; and, I perceive, you feel
The dint of pity: these are gracious drops.
Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold
Our Caesar’s vesture wounded? Look you here,
Here is himself, marr’d, as you see, with traitors.

First Citizen
O piteous spectacle!

Second Citizen
O noble Caesar!

Third Citizen
O woful day!

Fourth Citizen
O traitors, villains!

First Citizen
O most bloody sight!

Second Citizen
We will be revenged.

All
Revenge! About! Seek! Burn! Fire! Kill! Slay!
Let not a traitor live!

ANTONY
Stay, countrymen.

First Citizen
Peace there! hear the noble Antony.

Second Citizen
We’ll hear him, we’ll follow him, we’ll die with him.

ANTONY
Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up
To such a sudden flood of mutiny.
They that have done this deed are honourable:
What private griefs they have, alas, I know not,
That made them do it: they are wise and honourable,
And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you.
I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts:
I am no orator, as Brutus is;
But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man,
That love my friend; and that they know full well
That gave me public leave to speak of him:
For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth,
Action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech,
To stir men’s blood: I only speak right on;
I tell you that which you yourselves do know;
Show you sweet Caesar’s wounds, poor poor dumb mouths,
And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus,
And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony
Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue
In every wound of Caesar that should move
The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.

All
We’ll mutiny.

First Citizen
We’ll burn the house of Brutus.

Third Citizen
Away, then! come, seek the conspirators.

ANTONY
Yet hear me, countrymen; yet hear me speak.

All
Peace, ho! Hear Antony. Most noble Antony!

ANTONY
Why, friends, you go to do you know not what:
Wherein hath Caesar thus deserved your loves?
Alas, you know not: I must tell you then:
You have forgot the will I told you of.

All
Most true. The will! Let’s stay and hear the will.

ANTONY
Here is the will, and under Caesar’s seal.
To every Roman citizen he gives,
To every several man, seventy-five drachmas.

Second Citizen
Most noble Caesar! We’ll revenge his death.

Third Citizen
O royal Caesar!

ANTONY
Hear me with patience.

All
Peace, ho!

ANTONY
Moreover, he hath left you all his walks,
His private arbours and new-planted orchards,
On this side Tiber; he hath left them you,
And to your heirs for ever, common pleasures,
To walk abroad, and recreate yourselves.
Here was a Caesar! when comes such another?

First Citizen
Never, never. Come, away, away!
We’ll burn his body in the holy place,
And with the brands fire the traitors’ houses.
Take up the body.

Second Citizen
Go fetch fire.

Third Citizen
Pluck down benches.

Fourth Citizen
Pluck down forms, windows, any thing.
Exeunt Citizens with the body

ANTONY
Now let it work. Mischief, thou art afoot,
Take thou what course thou wilt!

Enter a Servant

How now, fellow!

Servant
Sir, Octavius is already come to Rome.

ANTONY
Where is he?

Servant
He and Lepidus are at Caesar’s house.

ANTONY
And thither will I straight to visit him:
He comes upon a wish. Fortune is merry,
And in this mood will give us any thing.

Servant
I heard him say, Brutus and Cassius
Are rid like madmen through the gates of Rome.

ANTONY
Belike they had some notice of the people,
How I had moved them. Bring me to Octavius.

Julius Caesar, Act III, scene ii. William Shakespeare (1599)

ANTONY
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious:
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answer’d it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest–
For Brutus is an honourable man;
So are they all, all honourable men–
Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
But Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
He hath brought many captives home to Rome
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:
Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept:
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And, sure, he is an honourable man.
I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause:
What cause withholds you then, to mourn for him?
O judgment! thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason. Bear with me;
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me.

First Citizen
Methinks there is much reason in his sayings.

Second Citizen
If thou consider rightly of the matter,
Caesar has had great wrong.

Third Citizen
Has he, masters?
I fear there will a worse come in his place.

Fourth Citizen
Mark’d ye his words? He would not take the crown;
Therefore ‘tis certain he was not ambitious.

First Citizen
If it be found so, some will dear abide it.

Second Citizen
Poor soul! his eyes are red as fire with weeping.

Third Citizen
There’s not a nobler man in Rome than Antony.

Fourth Citizen
Now mark him, he begins again to speak.

ANTONY
But yesterday the word of Caesar might
Have stood against the world; now lies he there.
And none so poor to do him reverence.
O masters, if I were disposed to stir
Your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage,
I should do Brutus wrong, and Cassius wrong,
Who, you all know, are honourable men:
I will not do them wrong; I rather choose
To wrong the dead, to wrong myself and you,
Than I will wrong such honourable men.
But here’s a parchment with the seal of Caesar;
I found it in his closet, ’tis his will:
Let but the commons hear this testament–
Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read–
And they would go and kiss dead Caesar’s wounds
And dip their napkins in his sacred blood,
Yea, beg a hair of him for memory,
And, dying, mention it within their wills,
Bequeathing it as a rich legacy
Unto their issue.

Fourth Citizen
We’ll hear the will: read it, Mark Antony.

All
The will, the will! we will hear Caesar’s will.

ANTONY
Have patience, gentle friends, I must not read it;
It is not meet you know how Caesar loved you.
You are not wood, you are not stones, but men;
And, being men, bearing the will of Caesar,
It will inflame you, it will make you mad:
‘Tis good you know not that you are his heirs;
For, if you should, O, what would come of it!

Fourth Citizen
Read the will; we’ll hear it, Antony;
You shall read us the will, Caesar’s will.

ANTONY
Will you be patient? will you stay awhile?
I have o’ershot myself to tell you of it:
I fear I wrong the honourable men
Whose daggers have stabb’d Caesar; I do fear it.

Fourth Citizen
They were traitors: honourable men!

All
The will! the testament!

Second Citizen
They were villains, murderers: the will! read the will.

ANTONY
You will compel me, then, to read the will?
Then make a ring about the corpse of Caesar,
And let me show you him that made the will.
Shall I descend? and will you give me leave?

Several Citizens
Come down.

Second Citizen
Descend.

Third Citizen
You shall have leave.

ANTONY comes down

Fourth Citizen
A ring; stand round.

First Citizen
Stand from the hearse, stand from the body.

Second Citizen
Room for Antony, most noble Antony.

ANTONY
Nay, press not so upon me; stand far off.

Several Citizens
Stand back; room; bear back.

ANTONY
If you have tears, prepare to shed them now.
You all do know this mantle: I remember
The first time ever Caesar put it on;
‘Twas on a summer’s evening, in his tent,
That day he overcame the Nervii:
Look, in this place ran Cassius’ dagger through:
See what a rent the envious Casca made:
Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabb’d;
And as he pluck’d his cursed steel away,
Mark how the blood of Caesar follow’d it,
As rushing out of doors, to be resolved
If Brutus so unkindly knock’d, or no;
For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar’s angel:
Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him!
This was the most unkindest cut of all;
For when the noble Caesar saw him stab,
Ingratitude, more strong than traitors’ arms,
Quite vanquish’d him: then burst his mighty heart;
And, in his mantle muffling up his face,
Even at the base of Pompey’s statua,
Which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell.
O, what a fall was there, my countrymen!
Then I, and you, and all of us fell down,
Whilst bloody treason flourish’d over us.
O, now you weep; and, I perceive, you feel
The dint of pity: these are gracious drops.
Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold
Our Caesar’s vesture wounded? Look you here,
Here is himself, marr’d, as you see, with traitors.

First Citizen
O piteous spectacle!

Second Citizen
O noble Caesar!

Third Citizen
O woful day!

Fourth Citizen
O traitors, villains!

First Citizen
O most bloody sight!

Second Citizen
We will be revenged.

All
Revenge! About! Seek! Burn! Fire! Kill! Slay!
Let not a traitor live!

ANTONY
Stay, countrymen.

First Citizen
Peace there! hear the noble Antony.

Second Citizen
We’ll hear him, we’ll follow him, we’ll die with him.

ANTONY
Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up
To such a sudden flood of mutiny.
They that have done this deed are honourable:
What private griefs they have, alas, I know not,
That made them do it: they are wise and honourable,
And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you.
I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts:
I am no orator, as Brutus is;
But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man,
That love my friend; and that they know full well
That gave me public leave to speak of him:
For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth,
Action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech,
To stir men’s blood: I only speak right on;
I tell you that which you yourselves do know;
Show you sweet Caesar’s wounds, poor poor dumb mouths,
And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus,
And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony
Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue
In every wound of Caesar that should move
The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.

All
We’ll mutiny.

First Citizen
We’ll burn the house of Brutus.

Third Citizen
Away, then! come, seek the conspirators.

ANTONY
Yet hear me, countrymen; yet hear me speak.

All
Peace, ho! Hear Antony. Most noble Antony!

ANTONY
Why, friends, you go to do you know not what:
Wherein hath Caesar thus deserved your loves?
Alas, you know not: I must tell you then:
You have forgot the will I told you of.

All
Most true. The will! Let’s stay and hear the will.

ANTONY
Here is the will, and under Caesar’s seal.
To every Roman citizen he gives,
To every several man, seventy-five drachmas.

Second Citizen
Most noble Caesar! We’ll revenge his death.

Third Citizen
O royal Caesar!

ANTONY
Hear me with patience.

All
Peace, ho!

ANTONY
Moreover, he hath left you all his walks,
His private arbours and new-planted orchards,
On this side Tiber; he hath left them you,
And to your heirs for ever, common pleasures,
To walk abroad, and recreate yourselves.
Here was a Caesar! when comes such another?

First Citizen
Never, never. Come, away, away!
We’ll burn his body in the holy place,
And with the brands fire the traitors’ houses.
Take up the body.

Second Citizen
Go fetch fire.

Third Citizen
Pluck down benches.

Fourth Citizen
Pluck down forms, windows, any thing.
Exeunt Citizens with the body

ANTONY
Now let it work. Mischief, thou art afoot,
Take thou what course thou wilt!

Enter a Servant

How now, fellow!

Servant
Sir, Octavius is already come to Rome.

ANTONY
Where is he?

Servant
He and Lepidus are at Caesar’s house.

ANTONY
And thither will I straight to visit him:
He comes upon a wish. Fortune is merry,
And in this mood will give us any thing.

Servant
I heard him say, Brutus and Cassius
Are rid like madmen through the gates of Rome.

ANTONY
Belike they had some notice of the people,
How I had moved them. Bring me to Octavius.

Julius Caesar, Act III, scene ii. William Shakespeare (1599)