NSA gathers data on social connections of U.S. citizens


shortformblog:

This is merely old information, rehashed with new and official information through more revelations reported by the NYTimes. It’s essentially to wake people up – we all use social networks – and to show how the government and the NSA collects our information that we share on social media, creating extensive maps and graphs. 

The NSA just wants to be your friend.

Friend the NSA.

Follow the NSA.

The NSA is following you.

NSA gathers data on social connections of U.S. citizens

NSA gathers data on social connections of U.S. citizens


shortformblog:

This is merely old information, rehashed with new and official information through more revelations reported by the NYTimes. It’s essentially to wake people up – we all use social networks – and to show how the government and the NSA collects our information that we share on social media, creating extensive maps and graphs. 

The NSA just wants to be your friend.

Friend the NSA.

Follow the NSA.

The NSA is following you.

NSA gathers data on social connections of U.S. citizens

There will be No Secrets soon.


As each means of secrecy is crushed soon there will be nowhere to be free. Why do I feel more and more like a tin-foil hat wearing lunatic?

I don’t even use these services but I feel that it is important that they be allowed to exist. 

First it was Lavabit:

My Fellow Users,

I have been forced to make a difficult decision: to become complicit in crimes against the American people or walk away from nearly ten years of hard work by shutting down Lavabit. After significant soul searching, I have decided to suspend operations. I wish that I could legally share with you the events that led to my decision. I cannot. I feel you deserve to know what’s going on–the first amendment is supposed to guarantee me the freedom to speak out in situations like this. Unfortunately, Congress has passed laws that say otherwise. As things currently stand, I cannot share my experiences over the last six weeks, even though I have twice made the appropriate requests.

What’s going to happen now? We’ve already started preparing the paperwork needed to continue to fight for the Constitution in the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals. A favorable decision would allow me resurrect Lavabit as an American company.

This experience has taught me one very important lesson: without congressional action or a strong judicial precedent, I would _strongly_ recommend against anyone trusting their private data to a company with physical ties to the United States.

Sincerely,
Ladar Levison
Owner and Operator, Lavabit LLC

Defending the constitution is expensive! Help us by donating to the Lavabit Legal Defense Fund

Then there was this about the Tor servers:

Two of the seven directory authority servers that the Tor Project uses to run its anonymous browsing service have been compromised, along with a new server that the project uses to host metrics and graphs.

The project’s organizers discovered the attack earlier this month and are advising users who run Tor nodes to upgrade to a new version of the software. However, the organizers said that there is no risk that the attackers could have matched Tor users to their browsing habits.“By design, Tor requires a majority of directory authorities (four in this case) to generate a consensus; and like other relays in the Tor network, directory authorities don’t know enough to match a user and traffic or destination,” Roger Dingledine, the original developer of the Tor Project wrote in an email this week.

“We’ve been very lucky the past few years regarding security. It still seems this breach is unrelated to Tor itself. To be clear, it doesn’t seem that anyone specifically attacked our servers to get at Tor. It seems we were attacked for the cpu capacity and bandwidth of the servers, and the servers just happened to also carry out functions for Tor.”

I need bunnies and ponies and alcohol.

There will be No Secrets soon.

There will be No Secrets soon.


As each means of secrecy is crushed soon there will be nowhere to be free. Why do I feel more and more like a tin-foil hat wearing lunatic?

I don’t even use these services but I feel that it is important that they be allowed to exist. 

First it was Lavabit:

My Fellow Users,

I have been forced to make a difficult decision: to become complicit in crimes against the American people or walk away from nearly ten years of hard work by shutting down Lavabit. After significant soul searching, I have decided to suspend operations. I wish that I could legally share with you the events that led to my decision. I cannot. I feel you deserve to know what’s going on–the first amendment is supposed to guarantee me the freedom to speak out in situations like this. Unfortunately, Congress has passed laws that say otherwise. As things currently stand, I cannot share my experiences over the last six weeks, even though I have twice made the appropriate requests.

What’s going to happen now? We’ve already started preparing the paperwork needed to continue to fight for the Constitution in the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals. A favorable decision would allow me resurrect Lavabit as an American company.

This experience has taught me one very important lesson: without congressional action or a strong judicial precedent, I would _strongly_ recommend against anyone trusting their private data to a company with physical ties to the United States.

Sincerely,
Ladar Levison
Owner and Operator, Lavabit LLC

Defending the constitution is expensive! Help us by donating to the Lavabit Legal Defense Fund

Then there was this about the Tor servers:

Two of the seven directory authority servers that the Tor Project uses to run its anonymous browsing service have been compromised, along with a new server that the project uses to host metrics and graphs.

The project’s organizers discovered the attack earlier this month and are advising users who run Tor nodes to upgrade to a new version of the software. However, the organizers said that there is no risk that the attackers could have matched Tor users to their browsing habits.“By design, Tor requires a majority of directory authorities (four in this case) to generate a consensus; and like other relays in the Tor network, directory authorities don’t know enough to match a user and traffic or destination,” Roger Dingledine, the original developer of the Tor Project wrote in an email this week.

“We’ve been very lucky the past few years regarding security. It still seems this breach is unrelated to Tor itself. To be clear, it doesn’t seem that anyone specifically attacked our servers to get at Tor. It seems we were attacked for the cpu capacity and bandwidth of the servers, and the servers just happened to also carry out functions for Tor.”

I need bunnies and ponies and alcohol.

There will be No Secrets soon.

Meet the NSA’s New Data Centers: Russia, China, and Venezuela


The surprising locations of the servers… reportedly include China, Ecuador, Russia, Sudan, and Venezuela. In short, the NSA has managed to either place or gain access to servers in a collection of countries that are deeply hostile to the United States. Put another way, computer technicians in every one of those countries are probably combing through their systems right now to figure out ways to boot out the NSA.

This is an interesting angle on the latest of Edward Snowden’s revelations.

Meet the NSA’s New Data Centers: Russia, China, and Venezuela

Meet the NSA’s New Data Centers: Russia, China, and Venezuela


The surprising locations of the servers… reportedly include China, Ecuador, Russia, Sudan, and Venezuela. In short, the NSA has managed to either place or gain access to servers in a collection of countries that are deeply hostile to the United States. Put another way, computer technicians in every one of those countries are probably combing through their systems right now to figure out ways to boot out the NSA.

This is an interesting angle on the latest of Edward Snowden’s revelations.

Meet the NSA’s New Data Centers: Russia, China, and Venezuela

Liberty, Liberalism and Surveillance: a historic overview | openDemocracy


To be free we not only need to have no fear of interference but no fear that there could be interference. But that latter assurance is precisely what cannot be given if our actions are under surveillance. So long as surveillance is going on, we always could have our freedom of action limited if someone chose to limit it. The fact that they may not make that choice does not make us any less free, because we are not free from surveillance and the possible uses that can be made of it. Only when we are free from such possible invasions of our rights are we free; and this freedom can be guaranteed only where there is no surveillance.

 


I feel that with every post I get but one step further away from that green card I crave.

Liberty, Liberalism and Surveillance: a historic overview | openDemocracy

Liberty, Liberalism and Surveillance: a historic overview | openDemocracy


To be free we not only need to have no fear of interference but no fear that there could be interference. But that latter assurance is precisely what cannot be given if our actions are under surveillance. So long as surveillance is going on, we always could have our freedom of action limited if someone chose to limit it. The fact that they may not make that choice does not make us any less free, because we are not free from surveillance and the possible uses that can be made of it. Only when we are free from such possible invasions of our rights are we free; and this freedom can be guaranteed only where there is no surveillance.

 


I feel that with every post I get but one step further away from that green card I crave.

Liberty, Liberalism and Surveillance: a historic overview | openDemocracy

The Case for Rage and Retribution


This was written for Time magazine by the journalist Lance Murrow two days after 9/11. 

I can imagine he was still impassioned after what happened, given that Time has offices in New York. 

I’ve pulled out a few choice quotes.

  • For once, let’s have no fatuous rhetoric about “healing.”

 

  • Let America explore the rich reciprocal possibilities of the fatwa.

 

  • A policy of focused brutality does not come easily to a self-conscious, self-indulgent, contradictory, diverse, humane nation with a short attention span

 

  • America needs to relearn a lost discipline, self-confident relentlessness–and to relearn why human nature has equipped us all with a weapon (abhorred in decent peacetime societies) called hatred.

 

  • It’s a practical matter, anyway. In war, enemies are enemies. You find them and put them out of business, on the sound principle that that’s what they are trying to do to you.

 

  • America, in the spasms of a few hours, became a changed country. It turned the corner, at last, out of the 1990s. The menu of American priorities was rearranged. The presidency of George W. Bush begins now. What seemed important a few days ago (in the media, at least) became instantly trivial

 

  • The worst times, as we see, separate the civilized of the world from the uncivilized. This is the moment of clarity. Let the civilized toughen up, and let the uncivilized take their chances in the game they started.

 

By all means read the whole article. It isn’t much longer than the sections I extracted it’s just that these particular extractions and the article as a whole are terrifying and mark in many ways the emotions that allowed for the surveillance state that we now live in.

 

Always best to watch out for those trick emotions no matter what the awful thing that has been done to you or your country.

 

As Gore Vidal said, “Goebbels never pulled it off that well.”

The Case for Rage and Retribution

The Case for Rage and Retribution


This was written for Time magazine by the journalist Lance Murrow two days after 9/11. 

I can imagine he was still impassioned after what happened, given that Time has offices in New York. 

I’ve pulled out a few choice quotes.

  • For once, let’s have no fatuous rhetoric about “healing.”

 

  • Let America explore the rich reciprocal possibilities of the fatwa.

 

  • A policy of focused brutality does not come easily to a self-conscious, self-indulgent, contradictory, diverse, humane nation with a short attention span

 

  • America needs to relearn a lost discipline, self-confident relentlessness–and to relearn why human nature has equipped us all with a weapon (abhorred in decent peacetime societies) called hatred.

 

  • It’s a practical matter, anyway. In war, enemies are enemies. You find them and put them out of business, on the sound principle that that’s what they are trying to do to you.

 

  • America, in the spasms of a few hours, became a changed country. It turned the corner, at last, out of the 1990s. The menu of American priorities was rearranged. The presidency of George W. Bush begins now. What seemed important a few days ago (in the media, at least) became instantly trivial

 

  • The worst times, as we see, separate the civilized of the world from the uncivilized. This is the moment of clarity. Let the civilized toughen up, and let the uncivilized take their chances in the game they started.

 

By all means read the whole article. It isn’t much longer than the sections I extracted it’s just that these particular extractions and the article as a whole are terrifying and mark in many ways the emotions that allowed for the surveillance state that we now live in.

 

Always best to watch out for those trick emotions no matter what the awful thing that has been done to you or your country.

 

As Gore Vidal said, “Goebbels never pulled it off that well.”

The Case for Rage and Retribution

Surveillance Blowback: The Making Of The US Surveillance State, 1898-2020


We’ve always been watched. 

It’s time to watch back.

Or something more eloquent and pro-active than what I just wrote…

Surveillance Blowback: The Making Of The US Surveillance State, 1898-2020

Surveillance Blowback: The Making Of The US Surveillance State, 1898-2020


We’ve always been watched. 

It’s time to watch back.

Or something more eloquent and pro-active than what I just wrote…

Surveillance Blowback: The Making Of The US Surveillance State, 1898-2020


politicalprof:

The government is winning the spin war: the more we focus on Snowden, the less we focus on spying. As shown on Twitter.

ht: Wonkblog

“People will see in the media all of these disclosures. They’ll know the lengths that the government is going to grant themselves powers unilaterally to create greater control over American society and global society. But they won’t be willing to take the risks necessary to stand up and fight to change things to force their representatives to actually take a stand in their interests.” Edward Snowden, The Guardian.

Turns out you were correct, Mr. Snowden.


politicalprof:

The government is winning the spin war: the more we focus on Snowden, the less we focus on spying. As shown on Twitter.

ht: Wonkblog

“People will see in the media all of these disclosures. They’ll know the lengths that the government is going to grant themselves powers unilaterally to create greater control over American society and global society. But they won’t be willing to take the risks necessary to stand up and fight to change things to force their representatives to actually take a stand in their interests.” Edward Snowden, The Guardian.

Turns out you were correct, Mr. Snowden.