medievalpoc:

Anonymous German Artist

Saint Gregory the Moor

Germany (1530s)

stone carving

60 cm.

The Image of the Black in Western Art Research Project and Photo Archive, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University


medievalpoc:

Anonymous German Artist

Saint Gregory the Moor

Germany (1530s)

stone carving

60 cm.

The Image of the Black in Western Art Research Project and Photo Archive, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University

Detaining my partner: a failed attempt at intimidation


This is obviously a rather profound escalation of their attacks on the news-gathering process and journalism. It’s bad enough to prosecute and imprison sources. It’s worse still to imprison journalists who report the truth. But to start detaining the family members and loved ones of journalists is simply despotic. Even the Mafia had ethical rules against targeting the family members of people they felt threatened by. But the UK puppets and their owners in the US national security state obviously are unconstrained by even those minimal scruples.

If the UK and US governments believe that tactics like this are going to deter or intimidate us in any way from continuing to report aggressively on what these documents reveal, they are beyond deluded. If anything, it will have only the opposite effect: to embolden us even further. Beyond that, every time the US and UK governments show their true character to the world – when they prevent the Bolivian President’s plane from flying safely home, when they threaten journalists with prosecution, when they engage in behavior like what they did today – all they do is helpfully underscore why it’s so dangerous to allow them to exercise vast, unchecked spying power in the dark.

Terrible but as a friend pointed out to me poc get arrested and detained for no reason every day of the year. 

So this is terrible but we live in a terrible fucking world.

So that would be a reason to defy all of this.

Detaining my partner: a failed attempt at intimidation

Detaining my partner: a failed attempt at intimidation


This is obviously a rather profound escalation of their attacks on the news-gathering process and journalism. It’s bad enough to prosecute and imprison sources. It’s worse still to imprison journalists who report the truth. But to start detaining the family members and loved ones of journalists is simply despotic. Even the Mafia had ethical rules against targeting the family members of people they felt threatened by. But the UK puppets and their owners in the US national security state obviously are unconstrained by even those minimal scruples.

If the UK and US governments believe that tactics like this are going to deter or intimidate us in any way from continuing to report aggressively on what these documents reveal, they are beyond deluded. If anything, it will have only the opposite effect: to embolden us even further. Beyond that, every time the US and UK governments show their true character to the world – when they prevent the Bolivian President’s plane from flying safely home, when they threaten journalists with prosecution, when they engage in behavior like what they did today – all they do is helpfully underscore why it’s so dangerous to allow them to exercise vast, unchecked spying power in the dark.

Terrible but as a friend pointed out to me poc get arrested and detained for no reason every day of the year. 

So this is terrible but we live in a terrible fucking world.

So that would be a reason to defy all of this.

Detaining my partner: a failed attempt at intimidation

So people thought this was a good idea…


bankuei:

So we’re really making a videogame set in 1930s Shanghai and calling it “Whore of the Orient"?!?!??

You don’t make period piece games about France called “Syphilis Depot of the West" or England, “Fecal Water Wellspring of Europe" so…

Seems atrocious.

Oh wait, because it is atrocious.

But it’s okay because that used to be it’s nickname and the game is merely reflecting the culture and the racism of the time…

…….

So good to see that video games continues a trend that find it’s origins in the finest movies of Hollywood’s golden age.

So people thought this was a good idea…


bankuei:

So we’re really making a videogame set in 1930s Shanghai and calling it “Whore of the Orient"?!?!??

You don’t make period piece games about France called “Syphilis Depot of the West" or England, “Fecal Water Wellspring of Europe" so…

Seems atrocious.

Oh wait, because it is atrocious.

But it’s okay because that used to be it’s nickname and the game is merely reflecting the culture and the racism of the time…

…….

So good to see that video games continues a trend that find it’s origins in the finest movies of Hollywood’s golden age.


girljanitor:

tommywiseau:

medievalpoc:

The all-white reinvention of Medieval Europe commonly depicted in popular fiction, films, tv shows and art is entirely that: a fiction. An invention. An erasure. Obviously, people of color have been an essential and integral part of European life, European art, and European literary imagination since time immemorial. To cite “historical accuracy" as a means to project whitewashed images of the past into the future to maintain a fiction of white supremacy is an unconscionable farce.

People of Color are not an anachronism.

Follow.

Ask.

Submit.

Most of this….. Isn’t…… Medieval…… Art

PSSSSST:

Some have criticized the fact that this blog’s url is “medievalpoc", because I post things from “pre-1000s" up until the 1700s.

A common misconception about Art History is that the “only" way to apply terms is according to the date the work was produced.

It’s amusing on one hand because this is a very “pop culture" concept of application of terms, and this is a blog directly addressing pop culture assumptions-one of the biggest ones is that people of color did not exist in Europe “before slavery and stuff".

Unfortunately, as many of the asks I have received from students can attest, this attitude worms its way into classrooms, journalism, academic writing…and it is equally valid to say that the attitude wormed its way FROM academia into popular culture and concepts thereof.

Some quick nuts and bolts: The “Medieval Era" or “Middle Ages" in Europe specifically, is an extremely general term which becomes even more blurry once you factor in a basic reality like geography into the equation. For example, the Renaissance began in Italy at least 200 years before it even began to touch the English upper classes.

Secondly, the “Middle Ages" didn’t really end for most poor people, which was most people, until the Industrial Revolution. The high-minded revival of Classical values and virtues in the Renaissance was for people who could afford it.

This is how you can end up with huge, complex Mannerist paintings coming out of Italy in the 1350s while Russia was still producing almost nothing but Byzantine-style icons (pre-1000s!) until the freaking 1800s. Baroque and Roccoco as existent styles skipped over entire countries, after all.

As for the Middle Ages themselves, as an entire and whole concept applied in the Humanities to not only Art History but Philosophy, History, Politics, Sociology, Anthropology, ethnography, and every and any other -ology you’d care to throw at them, it depends on who you ask, and where, and when you asked them!

To elucidate, have some Wikipedia:

The most commonly given starting point for the Middle Ages is 476,[11] first used by Bruni.[6][A] For Europe as a whole, 1500 is often considered to be the end of the Middle Ages,[13]but there is no universally agreed upon end date. Depending on the context, events such as Christopher Columbus’s first voyage to the Americas in 1492, the conquest of Constantinople by the Turks in 1453, or the Protestant Reformation in 1517 are sometimes used.[14] English historians often use the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485 to mark the end of the period.[15] For Spain, dates commonly used are the death of King Ferdinand II in 1516, the death of Queen Isabella I of Castile in 1504, or the conquest of Granada in 1492.[16]

Historians from Romance-speaking countries tend to divide the Middle Ages into two parts: an earlier “High" and later “Low" period. English-speaking historians, following their German counterparts, generally subdivide the Middle Ages into three intervals: “Early", “High", and “Late".[2] In the 19th century, the entire Middle Ages were often referred to as the “Dark Ages”,[17][B] but with the adoption of these subdivisions, use of this term was restricted to the Early Middle Ages, at least among historians.[3]


Lastly but not least…ly…. anyhow, using work that is visibly and recognizably Rococo or Early Modern doesn’t dilute the purpose of this blog, since all of those styles are considered ubiquitously European and so-very-white.

It complicates things a bit because the fascination with colonialism, exotification, othering, enslavement, dehumanization and other unsavory aspects of European depictions of people of color come to the forefront in the arts. This also coincides with the spread of racial concepts like “white people” and the institutionalization and codification of American chattel slavery into law and society.

TL;DR:

Art in Florence, Italy circa 1500:

image

Art in Moscow, Russia in 1500:

image

And that’s why “Medieval" is a fairly arbitrary term.

Love this


girljanitor:

tommywiseau:

medievalpoc:

The all-white reinvention of Medieval Europe commonly depicted in popular fiction, films, tv shows and art is entirely that: a fiction. An invention. An erasure. Obviously, people of color have been an essential and integral part of European life, European art, and European literary imagination since time immemorial. To cite “historical accuracy" as a means to project whitewashed images of the past into the future to maintain a fiction of white supremacy is an unconscionable farce.

People of Color are not an anachronism.

Follow.

Ask.

Submit.

Most of this….. Isn’t…… Medieval…… Art

PSSSSST:

Some have criticized the fact that this blog’s url is “medievalpoc", because I post things from “pre-1000s" up until the 1700s.

A common misconception about Art History is that the “only" way to apply terms is according to the date the work was produced.

It’s amusing on one hand because this is a very “pop culture" concept of application of terms, and this is a blog directly addressing pop culture assumptions-one of the biggest ones is that people of color did not exist in Europe “before slavery and stuff".

Unfortunately, as many of the asks I have received from students can attest, this attitude worms its way into classrooms, journalism, academic writing…and it is equally valid to say that the attitude wormed its way FROM academia into popular culture and concepts thereof.

Some quick nuts and bolts: The “Medieval Era" or “Middle Ages" in Europe specifically, is an extremely general term which becomes even more blurry once you factor in a basic reality like geography into the equation. For example, the Renaissance began in Italy at least 200 years before it even began to touch the English upper classes.

Secondly, the “Middle Ages" didn’t really end for most poor people, which was most people, until the Industrial Revolution. The high-minded revival of Classical values and virtues in the Renaissance was for people who could afford it.

This is how you can end up with huge, complex Mannerist paintings coming out of Italy in the 1350s while Russia was still producing almost nothing but Byzantine-style icons (pre-1000s!) until the freaking 1800s. Baroque and Roccoco as existent styles skipped over entire countries, after all.

As for the Middle Ages themselves, as an entire and whole concept applied in the Humanities to not only Art History but Philosophy, History, Politics, Sociology, Anthropology, ethnography, and every and any other -ology you’d care to throw at them, it depends on who you ask, and where, and when you asked them!

To elucidate, have some Wikipedia:

The most commonly given starting point for the Middle Ages is 476,[11] first used by Bruni.[6][A] For Europe as a whole, 1500 is often considered to be the end of the Middle Ages,[13]but there is no universally agreed upon end date. Depending on the context, events such as Christopher Columbus’s first voyage to the Americas in 1492, the conquest of Constantinople by the Turks in 1453, or the Protestant Reformation in 1517 are sometimes used.[14] English historians often use the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485 to mark the end of the period.[15] For Spain, dates commonly used are the death of King Ferdinand II in 1516, the death of Queen Isabella I of Castile in 1504, or the conquest of Granada in 1492.[16]

Historians from Romance-speaking countries tend to divide the Middle Ages into two parts: an earlier “High" and later “Low" period. English-speaking historians, following their German counterparts, generally subdivide the Middle Ages into three intervals: “Early", “High", and “Late".[2] In the 19th century, the entire Middle Ages were often referred to as the “Dark Ages”,[17][B] but with the adoption of these subdivisions, use of this term was restricted to the Early Middle Ages, at least among historians.[3]


Lastly but not least…ly…. anyhow, using work that is visibly and recognizably Rococo or Early Modern doesn’t dilute the purpose of this blog, since all of those styles are considered ubiquitously European and so-very-white.

It complicates things a bit because the fascination with colonialism, exotification, othering, enslavement, dehumanization and other unsavory aspects of European depictions of people of color come to the forefront in the arts. This also coincides with the spread of racial concepts like “white people” and the institutionalization and codification of American chattel slavery into law and society.

TL;DR:

Art in Florence, Italy circa 1500:

image

Art in Moscow, Russia in 1500:

image

And that’s why “Medieval" is a fairly arbitrary term.

Love this