Lessons from the past #23


(I stole this thought from another blog that I barely use)

As I happened to be reading Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, this Sunday morning, I came across a passage that resonated as regards the current and approaching Circus. Here I share it with you now:

For a long while before the appointed time is at hand the election becomes the most important and the all-engrossing topic of discussion. The ardor of faction is redoubled; and all the artificial passions which the imagination can create in the bosom of a happy and peaceful land are agitated and brought to light. The President, on the other hand, is absorbed by the cares of self-defence. He no longer governs for the interest of the State, but for that of his re-election; he does homage to the majority, and instead of checking its passions, as his duty commands him to do, he frequently courts its worst caprices. As the election draws near, the activity of intrigue and the agitation of the populace increase; the citizens are divided into hostile camps, each of which assumes the name of its favorite candidate; the whole nation glows with feverish excitement; the election is the daily theme of the public papers, the subject of private conversation, the end of every thought and every action , the sole interest of the present. As soon as the choice is determined, this ardor is dispelled; and as a calmer season returns, the current of the State, which had nearly broken its banks, sinks to its usual level: but who can refrain from astonishment at the causes of the storm.

Thus do we continue to return to the thing that we try to escape from.

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Lessons from the past #23


(I stole this thought from another blog that I barely use)

As I happened to be reading Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, this Sunday morning, I came across a passage that resonated as regards the current and approaching Circus. Here I share it with you now:

For a long while before the appointed time is at hand the election becomes the most important and the all-engrossing topic of discussion. The ardor of faction is redoubled; and all the artificial passions which the imagination can create in the bosom of a happy and peaceful land are agitated and brought to light. The President, on the other hand, is absorbed by the cares of self-defence. He no longer governs for the interest of the State, but for that of his re-election; he does homage to the majority, and instead of checking its passions, as his duty commands him to do, he frequently courts its worst caprices. As the election draws near, the activity of intrigue and the agitation of the populace increase; the citizens are divided into hostile camps, each of which assumes the name of its favorite candidate; the whole nation glows with feverish excitement; the election is the daily theme of the public papers, the subject of private conversation, the end of every thought and every action , the sole interest of the present. As soon as the choice is determined, this ardor is dispelled; and as a calmer season returns, the current of the State, which had nearly broken its banks, sinks to its usual level: but who can refrain from astonishment at the causes of the storm.

Thus do we continue to return to the thing that we try to escape from.

Books to warm the political soul


So many books so little time. Here are a few books that perfectly capture the flavour and passion that American Politics engenders. I enjoyed them. I hope you do too.

  1. Democracy in America: Everything you need to know about how little everything has changed.
  2. Primary Colors: Insights into a “fictional” Democratic Primary and the treasures therein.
  3. Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, McCain and Palin, and the Race of a Lifetime: Melodrama, soap opera, tele-novella. Reality, once again, trumps fiction.
  4. Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail ‘72: Gonzo peels the flesh off the bones.

Books to warm the political soul


So many books so little time. Here are a few books that perfectly capture the flavour and passion that American Politics engenders. I enjoyed them. I hope you do too.

  1. Democracy in America: Everything you need to know about how little everything has changed.
  2. Primary Colors: Insights into a “fictional” Democratic Primary and the treasures therein.
  3. Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, McCain and Palin, and the Race of a Lifetime: Melodrama, soap opera, tele-novella. Reality, once again, trumps fiction.
  4. Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail ‘72: Gonzo peels the flesh off the bones.

I was very excited because The Naked Cowboy did put down his name for the race for The White House 2012. 

I then realised the last time I had heard this story was late in 2010 so I thought I’d check up on his campaign as I hadn’t seen him at any of the debates.

To my horror, on clicking on this website: http://nc4president.com/ I found that his subscription had lapsed. NOOOOOOOOOOOO! Today is the day that democracy truly died. Truly. Died. Not Truly Scrumptious, no, Truly Died.

(Thank you for the Chitty-Chitty Bang Bang joke; you are welcome.)

In my despair I continue to search for cowboy nakedness and thankfully discovered he has a reality show on Youtube. So click his picture and enjoy, as I enjoyed, the greatest 10 minutes of my life. You can then worry, as I did, as to how long he will be allowed to use the opening credits of The Sopranos, without being beaten around the ankles with lead piping, by HBO.


I was very excited because The Naked Cowboy did put down his name for the race for The White House 2012. 

I then realised the last time I had heard this story was late in 2010 so I thought I’d check up on his campaign as I hadn’t seen him at any of the debates.

To my horror, on clicking on this website: http://nc4president.com/ I found that his subscription had lapsed. NOOOOOOOOOOOO! Today is the day that democracy truly died. Truly. Died. Not Truly Scrumptious, no, Truly Died.

(Thank you for the Chitty-Chitty Bang Bang joke; you are welcome.)

In my despair I continue to search for cowboy nakedness and thankfully discovered he has a reality show on Youtube. So click his picture and enjoy, as I enjoyed, the greatest 10 minutes of my life. You can then worry, as I did, as to how long he will be allowed to use the opening credits of The Sopranos, without being beaten around the ankles with lead piping, by HBO.

Culture of Illusion – Observations from the past…


As I happened to be reading Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, this Sunday morning, I came across a passage that seems to contain some resonance as regards the approaching Circus. Here I share it with you now:

For a long while before the appointed time is at hand the election becomes the most important and the all-engrossing topic of discussion. The ardor of faction is redoubled; and all the artificial passions which the imagination can create in the bosom of a happy and peaceful land are agitated and brought to light. The President, on the other hand, is absorbed by the cares of self-defence. He no longer governs for the interest of the State, but for that of his re-election; he does homage to the majority, and instead of checking its passions, as his duty commands him to do, he frequently courts its worst caprices. As the election draws near, the activity of intrigue and the agitation of the populace increase; the citizens are divided into hostile camps, each of which assumes the name of its favorite candidate; the whole nation glows with feverish excitement; the election is the daily theme of the public papers, the subject of private conversation, the end of every thought and every action , the sole interest of the present. As soon as the choice is determined, this ardor is dispelled; and as a calmer season returns, the current of the State, which had nearly broken its banks, sinks to its usual level: but who can refrain from astonishment at the causes of the storm.

Same as it ever was. Same as it ever was. Same as it ever was. etc. etc. etc.

Observations from the past…


As I happened to be reading Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, this Sunday morning, I came across a passage that seems to contain some resonance as regards the approaching Circus. Here I share it with you now.

For a long while before the appointed time is at hand the election becomes the most important and the all-engrossing topic of discussion. The ardor of faction is redoubled; and all the artificial passions which the imagination can create in the bosom of a happy and peaceful land are agitated and brought to light. The President, on the other hand, is absorbed by the cares of self-defence. He no longer governs for the interest of the State, but for that of his re-election; he does homage to the majority, and instead of checking its passions, as his duty commands him to do, he frequently courts its worst caprices. As the election draws near, the activity of intrigue and the agitation of the populace increase; the citizens are divided into hostile camps, each of which assumes the name of its favorite candidate; the whole nation glows with feverish excitement; the election is the daily theme of the public papers, the subject of private conversation, the end of every thought and every action , the sole interest of the present. As soon as the choice is determined, this ardor is dispelled; and as a calmer season returns, the current of the State, which had nearly broken its banks, sinks to its usual level: but who can refrain from astonishment at the causes of the storm.

Same as it ever was. Same as it ever was. Same as it ever was. etc. etc. etc.

Observations from the past…


As I happened to be reading Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, this Sunday morning, I came across a passage that seems to contain some resonance as regards the approaching Circus. Here I share it with you now.

For a long while before the appointed time is at hand the election becomes the most important and the all-engrossing topic of discussion. The ardor of faction is redoubled; and all the artificial passions which the imagination can create in the bosom of a happy and peaceful land are agitated and brought to light. The President, on the other hand, is absorbed by the cares of self-defence. He no longer governs for the interest of the State, but for that of his re-election; he does homage to the majority, and instead of checking its passions, as his duty commands him to do, he frequently courts its worst caprices. As the election draws near, the activity of intrigue and the agitation of the populace increase; the citizens are divided into hostile camps, each of which assumes the name of its favorite candidate; the whole nation glows with feverish excitement; the election is the daily theme of the public papers, the subject of private conversation, the end of every thought and every action , the sole interest of the present. As soon as the choice is determined, this ardor is dispelled; and as a calmer season returns, the current of the State, which had nearly broken its banks, sinks to its usual level: but who can refrain from astonishment at the causes of the storm.

Same as it ever was. Same as it ever was. Same as it ever was. etc. etc. etc.