Sudden Improvements in Egypt Suggest a Campaign to Undermine Morsi


The sudden end of crippling energy shortages and the re-emergence of the police suggest that those opposed to President Mohamed Morsi had tried to undermine his administration.

And also this, earlier in the year:

Egypt loan talks end without deal but IMF sees progress

I’m sure that there’s no connection to be made here but I just have this nagging feeling at the back of my mind that something a little suspicious is happening here.

Clearly I have not been lying down enough.

Sudden Improvements in Egypt Suggest a Campaign to Undermine Morsi

Sudden Improvements in Egypt Suggest a Campaign to Undermine Morsi


The sudden end of crippling energy shortages and the re-emergence of the police suggest that those opposed to President Mohamed Morsi had tried to undermine his administration.

And also this, earlier in the year:

Egypt loan talks end without deal but IMF sees progress

I’m sure that there’s no connection to be made here but I just have this nagging feeling at the back of my mind that something a little suspicious is happening here.

Clearly I have not been lying down enough.

Sudden Improvements in Egypt Suggest a Campaign to Undermine Morsi


The Secret police—the NSA, the CIA, et al—are by their very nature antithetical to those ideals, because openness and transparency about rules are essential to democratic public justification, and therefore to the legitimacy of state power. What must be secret cannot be fully democratic. One may well worry whether we can afford such a demanding standard of legitimate government in such a dangerous world. Perhaps we cannot. Perhaps it is foolish to be too good. But in that case we need to be clear-headed about it, and understand that secret police are a straightforwardly anti-democratic concession we make to a dangerous world. And we ought to accept that any strengthening of the powers of the secret police—especially the secret strengthening of the powers of the secret police—is a further blow to democracy and the legitimacy of our laws. The NSA’s digital dragnet is a silent coup. The filibuster is rain on election day.

The Economist (via azspot)

It does pose the question though, does The Economist think that the world is dangerous enough to give secret police free reign?

Surely the world can never be that dangerous and, if it is, perhaps time would be better spent working out why it is so dangerous and going someway to addressing those problems.

Would it be unusual to suggest that most people want a ready supply of food, water, shelter and human connection? That they want to do meaningful work that gives them self respect and the feeling of being a valuable member in the society in which they live? That they want freedom from persecution and torture and the right to engage and decide the things that affect them, their family and their community in a way that allows them to retain dignity and hope?

I guess I’ll never be a writer for The Economist because I just feel I don’t understand how the world really works.


The Secret police—the NSA, the CIA, et al—are by their very nature antithetical to those ideals, because openness and transparency about rules are essential to democratic public justification, and therefore to the legitimacy of state power. What must be secret cannot be fully democratic. One may well worry whether we can afford such a demanding standard of legitimate government in such a dangerous world. Perhaps we cannot. Perhaps it is foolish to be too good. But in that case we need to be clear-headed about it, and understand that secret police are a straightforwardly anti-democratic concession we make to a dangerous world. And we ought to accept that any strengthening of the powers of the secret police—especially the secret strengthening of the powers of the secret police—is a further blow to democracy and the legitimacy of our laws. The NSA’s digital dragnet is a silent coup. The filibuster is rain on election day.

The Economist (via azspot)

It does pose the question though, does The Economist think that the world is dangerous enough to give secret police free reign?

Surely the world can never be that dangerous and, if it is, perhaps time would be better spent working out why it is so dangerous and going someway to addressing those problems.

Would it be unusual to suggest that most people want a ready supply of food, water, shelter and human connection? That they want to do meaningful work that gives them self respect and the feeling of being a valuable member in the society in which they live? That they want freedom from persecution and torture and the right to engage and decide the things that affect them, their family and their community in a way that allows them to retain dignity and hope?

I guess I’ll never be a writer for The Economist because I just feel I don’t understand how the world really works.


theatlantic:

Kim Jong Un death rumors spread on Twitter, Weibo 

It could be nothing more than a rumor, but word on China’s Twitter equivalent, Weibo, is that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has died in a possible coup.

The news, which would be a huge game-changer if true, has started to seep into Twitter, with MIT journalism instructor Seth Mnookin tweeting, “Rumor of assassination also floating around; no confirmation RT @KSHartnett Hearing word of #NorthKorea coup. Kim Jong Un on the run.” The news apparently spreading among traders, as journalist Harry Cole reports. But everybody with half a brain is treating the rumor with a good deal of suspicion. Read more.

[Image: Reuters]

Screw the facts, let’s keep the rumour going! OR better yet start a Kim Jong Un pretending he’s holding up an invisible tray photoblog.


theatlantic:

Kim Jong Un death rumors spread on Twitter, Weibo 

It could be nothing more than a rumor, but word on China’s Twitter equivalent, Weibo, is that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has died in a possible coup.

The news, which would be a huge game-changer if true, has started to seep into Twitter, with MIT journalism instructor Seth Mnookin tweeting, “Rumor of assassination also floating around; no confirmation RT @KSHartnett Hearing word of #NorthKorea coup. Kim Jong Un on the run.” The news apparently spreading among traders, as journalist Harry Cole reports. But everybody with half a brain is treating the rumor with a good deal of suspicion. Read more.

[Image: Reuters]

Screw the facts, let’s keep the rumour going! OR better yet start a Kim Jong Un pretending he’s holding up an invisible tray photoblog.