thecivilwarparlor:

2015, International Women’s Day! How Far We’ve Come 

Celebrated globally on 8 March, will highlight the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, a historic road map signed by 189 governments 20 years ago that sets the agenda for realizing women’s rights. While there have been many achievements since then, many serious gaps remain.

Women fought for more than 200 years to obtain the rights that were guaranteed to men in the U.S. Constitution. When the nineteenth century began, a woman was not allowed to vote. The History Of Women And The Right To Vote~

Woman Suffrage Timeline (1840-1920)

1840

Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton are barred from attending the World Anti-Slavery Convention held in London. This prompts them to hold a Women’s Convention in the US.

1848

Seneca Falls, New York is the location for the first Women’s Rights Convention. Elizabeth Cady Stanton writes “The Declaration of Sentiments” creating the agenda of women’s activism for decades to come.

1849

The first state constitution in California extends property rights to women.

1850

Worcester, Massachusetts, is the site of the first National Women’s Rights Convention. An alliance is formed Frederick Douglass, Paulina Wright Davis, Abby Kelley Foster, William Lloyd Garrison, Lucy Stone and Sojourner Truth are in attendance. A strong alliance is formed with the Abolitionist Movement.

1851

Worcester, Massachusetts is the site of the second National Women’s Rights Convention. Participants included: Horace Mann, New York Tribune columnist Elizabeth Oaks Smith, and Reverend Harry Ward Beecher, one of the nation’s most popular preachers.

At a women’s rights convention in Akron, Ohio, Sojourner Truth, a former slave, delivers her now memorable speech “Ain’t I a woman?”

1852

The issue of women’s property rights is presented to the Vermont Senate by Clara Howard Nichols. This is a major issue for the Suffragists.

“Uncle Tom’s Cabin” by Harriet Beecher Stowe, is published and quickly becomes a bestseller.

1853

Women delegates, Antoinette Brown and Susan B. Anthony, are not allowed to speak at The World’s Temperance Convention held in New York City.

1857

The Married Woman’s Property Bill passes in the U.S. Congress.  Women can how sue, be sued, make contracts, inherit and bequeath property.

1861-1865

During the Civil War, efforts for the suffrage movement come to a halt. Women put their energies toward the war effort.

1866

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony form the American Equal Rights Association, an organization dedicated to the goal of suffrage for all regardless of gender or race.

CONTINUED TIMELINEhttps://www.nwhm.org/education-resources/history/woman-suffrage-timeline

 – See more at: http://www.unwomen.org/en/news/in-focus/international-womens-day#sthash.tw9O9vVu.dpuf

Come far for some
The road still to travel
Is long
And will be hard
For all.

Published by

The Sleepcoat League

Armchair anthropologist, sometime scribe, freelance philosopher, amateur artist, part-time poet, musical maven, alliteration aficionado.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s